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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



Martha








In four acts by FLOTOW.

Text by W. FRIEDRICH.


This charming opera finally established the renown of its composer, who
had first found his way to public favor through "Stradella".--It
ranks high among our comic operas, and has become as much liked as
those of Lortzing and Nicolai.

Not the least of its merits lies in the text, which Friedrich worked
out dexterously, and which is amusing and interesting throughout.

Lady Harriet Durham, tired of the pleasures and splendours of Court,
determines to seek elsewhere for a pastime, and hoping to find it in a
sphere different from her own, disguises herself and her confidant
Nancy as peasant-girls, in which garb they visit the Fair at Richmond,
accompanied by Lord Tristan, who is hopelessly enamoured of Lady
Harriet and unwillingly complies with her wish to escort them to the
adventure in the attire of a peasant.--They join the servant-girls, who
are there to seek employment, and are hired by a tenant Plumkett and
his foster-brother Lionel, a youth of somewhat extraordinary behaviour,
his air being noble and melancholy and much too refined for a
country-squire, while the other, though somewhat rough, is frank and
jolly in his manner.

The disguised ladies take the handsel from them, without knowing that
they are bound by it, until the sheriff arrives to confirm the bargain.
Now the joke becomes reality and they hear that they are actually hired
as servants for a whole year.

Notwithstanding Lord Tristan's protestations, the ladies are carried
off by their masters, who know them under the names of Martha and Julia.

In the second act we find the ladies in the company of the tenants, who
set them instantly to work. Of course they are totally ignorant
of household-work, and as their wheels will not go round, Plumkett
shows them how to spin. In his rough but kind way he always commands
and turns to Nancy, with whom he falls in love, but Lionel only asks
softly when he wishes anything done. He has lost his heart to Lady
Harriet and declares his love to her. Though she is pleased by his
gentle behaviour, she is by no means willing to accept a country-squire
and wounds him by her mockery. Meanwhile Plumkett has sought Nancy for
the same purpose, but she hides herself and at last the girls are sent
to bed very anxious and perplexed at the turn their adventure has
taken. But Lord Tristan comes to their rescue in a coach and they take
flight, vainly pursued by the tenants.--Plumkett swears to catch and
punish them, but Lionel sinks into deep melancholy, from which nothing
can arouse him.

In the third act we meet them at a Court-hunt, where they recognize
their hired servants in two of the lady-hunters. They assert their
right, but the Ladies disown them haughtily, and when Lionel, whose
reason almost gives way under the burden of grief and shame, which
overwhelms him at thinking himself deceived by Martha, tells the whole
story to the astonished Court, the Ladies pronounce him insane and Lord
Tristan sends him to prison for his insolence, notwithstanding Lady
Harriet and Nancy's prayer for his pardon.

Lionel gives a ring to Plumkett, asking him to show it to the
Queen, his dying father having told him that it would protect him from
every danger.

In the fourth act Lady Harriet feels remorse for the sad consequences
of her haughtiness. She visits the prisoner to crave his pardon. She
tells him that she has herself carried his ring to the Queen and that
he has been recognized by it as Lord Derby's son, once banished from
Court, but whose innocence is now proved.

Then the proud Lady offers hand and heart to Lionel, but he rejects
her, believing himself duped. Lady Harriet, however who loves Lionel,
resolves to win him against his will. She disappears, and dressing
herself and Nancy in the former peasant's attire, she goes once more to
the Fair at Richmond, where Lionel is also brought by his friend
Plumkett. He sees his beloved Martha advance towards him, promising to
renounce all splendors and live only for him; then his melancholy
vanishes; and he weds her, his name and possessions being restored to
him, while Plumkett obtains the hand of pretty Nancy, alias Julia.





Next: The Master-singers Of Nueremberg

Previous: Marguerite



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