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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



Il Barbiere Di Seviglia








In two acts by ROSSINI.


This opera may be called a miracle of Rossini's creation, as it not
only is his best work, but was written by him in a fortnight, a
performance nearly incredible, for the music is so finely worked out,
and so elegant, that the opera has grown to be a favorite with all
nations.

The subject, taken from Beaumarchais' witty trilogy of "Figaros" had
ere this lent inspiration to more than one composer; Mozart's
"Figaro", though done before the "Barbiere" is in a certain sense the
continuation of Rossini's opera.

The Barbiere had the peculiar misfortune, to experience an utter
reverse on the occasion of its first representation. It was composed
for the Duke Cesarini, proprietor of the Argentina theatre in Rome, and
the cabals and intrigues of Paesiello's partisans (who had composed the
same subject) turned the balance in Rossini's disfavor. But on the
second evening good taste prevailed, and since then the opera has been
a universal favorite.

Beaumarchais' tale was worked out anew by the Roman poet, Sterbini; in
our opera it runs as follows:

Count Almaviva is enamoured of Rosina, the ward of Doctor Bartolo. She
is most jealously guarded by the old man, who wishes to make her his
own wife. In vain the Count serenades her; she does not appear, and he
must needs invent some other means of obtaining his object. Making the
acquaintance of the lighthearted and cunning barber Figaro, the latter
advises him to get entrance into Bartolo's house in the guise of a
soldier possessing a billet of quartering for his lodgings. Rosina
herself has not failed to hear the sweet love-songs of the Count, known
to her only under the simple name of Lindoro; and with southern
passion, and the lightheartedness, which characterizes all the persons
who figure in this opera, but which is not to be mistaken for
frivolity, Rosina loves her nice lover and is willing to be his
own. Figaro has told her of Almaviva's love, and in return she gives
him a note, which she has written in secret. But the old Doctor is a
sly fox, he has seen the inky little finger, and determines to keep his
eyes open.

When the Count appears in the guise of a half-drunken dragoon, the
Doctor sends Rosina away, and tries to put the soldier out of the
house, pretending to have a license against all billets. The Count
resists, and while Bartolo seeks for his license, makes love to Rosina,
but after the Doctor's return there arises such an uproar, that all the
neighbors and finally the guards appear, who counsel the Count to
retire for once.

In the second act the Count gains entrance to Bartolo's house as a
singing-master who is deputed to give a lesson instead of the
feverstricken Basilio. Of course the music-lesson is turned into a
love-lesson.

When all seems to be going well, the real Maestro, Basilio, enters and
all but frustrates their plans. With gold and promises Figaro bribes
him to retreat, and the lovers agree to flee on the coming night.

Almost at the last moment the cunning of Bartolo hinders the projected
elopement, he shows a letter, which Rosina has written, and makes
Rosina believe that her lover, whom she only knows as Lindoro, in
concert with Figaro is betraying her to the Count. Great is her joy,
when she detects, that Lindoro and Count Almaviva are one and the
same person, and that he loves her as truly as ever.--They bribe the
old notary, who has been sent for by Bartolo to arrange his own
(Bartolo's) wedding with Rosina. Bartolo signs the contract of
marriage, with Figaro as witness, and detects too late that he has been
duped, and that he has himself united the lovers. At last he submits
with pretty good grace to the inevitable, and contents himself with
Rosina's dowry, which the Count generously transfers to him.





Next: Benvenuto Cellini

Previous: The Barber Of Bagdad



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