—Prayer —Faith Although He Died Believing His Mission Had Failed, His Prayer Was More Than Answered. THE LESSON—That "the effectual, fervent prayer of a righteous man availeth much." The life of Christophe... Read more of Christopher Columbus at How to Draw.caInformational Site Network Informational
Privacy
     Home - All Operas - Opera Stories - Opera History - Opera Physiology

Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Ingrid








In two acts by KARL GRAMANN.

Text by T. KERSTEN.


Ingrid is a musical composition of considerable interest, the local
tone and colouring being so well hit. It is a Norwegian picture
with many pretty and original customs, to which the music is well
adapted and effective, without being heart-stirring.

The scene is laid in Varoe in Norway. Helga the rich Norwegian peasant
Wandrup's daughter is to wed Godila Swestorp, her cousin, and the most
desirable young man in the village. She entertains but friendly
feelings for him while her heart belongs to a young German traveller,
and Godila, feeling that she is different from what she was, keeps
jealous watch over her, and swears to destroy his rival.

In the second scene Ingrid, a young girl (coach-maid), whose business
it is to direct the carioles from station to station, drives up with
the German Erhard, who meeting with a severe accident in the mountains,
is saved by her courage. Full of tenderness she dresses his wounds; he
thanks her warmly, and presents her with a miniature portrait of his
mother. She mistakes her gratitude for love, and it fills her with
happiness, which is instantly destroyed, when Helga appears and sinks
on the breast of her lover. Ingrid, a poor orphan, who never knew
father or mother, is deeply disappointed and bitterly reproaches heaven
for her hard fate. The scene is witnessed by old father Wandrup, in
whose heart it arouses long buried memories and he tries to console
Ingrid. But when she claims the right to hear more of her parents he
only says, that she was found a babe at his threshold twenty-five
years ago, and that nothing was ever heard of her father and mother.

The second act opens with a pretty national festival, in which the
youths and maidens, adorned with wild carnations wend their way in
couples to Ljora (love's-bridge in the people's mouth), from whence
they drop their flowers into the foaming water. If they chance to be
carried out to sea together, the lovers will be united, if not, woe to
them, for love and friendship will die an untimely death.--Godila tries
to offer his carnations to Helga, but she dextrously avoids him, and
succeeds in having a short interview with Erhard, with whom she is to
take flight on a ship, whose arrival is just announced. Erhard goes
off to prepare everything, and a few minutes afterwards Helga comes out
of the house in a travelling dress. But Godila, who has promised
Wandrup to watch over his daughter, detains her.

Wild with love and jealousy he strains her to his breast and drags her
towards the Ljora-bridge. Helga vainly struggles against the madman,
but Ingrid, who has witnessed the whole occurence, waves her white
kerchief in the direction of the ship, and calls back Erhard, who is
just in time to spring on the bridge, when its railing gives way, and
Godila, who has let Helga fall at the approach of his enemy, is
precipitated into the waves. Erhard tries to save him, but is
prevented by Ingrid, who intimates that all efforts would be useless.
Helga in a swoon is carried to the House, when Wandrup, seeing
his child wounded and apparently lifeless, calls Godila, and hears with
horror that his body has been found dashed to pieces on the rocks. Now
the father's wrath turns against Erhard, in whom he sees Godila's
murderer, but Ingrid, stepping forth, relates how the catastrophe
happened, and how Godila seemed to be punished by heaven for his attack
on Helga. Everybody is touched by poor despised Ingrid's
unselfishness, she even pleads for Helga's union with Erhard, nobly
renouncing her own claims on his love and gratitude. Wandrup relents
and the happy lovers go on the Ljora-bridge, whence their carnations
float out to sea side by side. The ship's departure is signalled, and
all accompany the lovers on board. Only Ingrid remains. Her strength
of mind has forsaken her; a prey to wild despair she resolves to
destroy herself. Taking a last look at Erhard's gift, the little
medallion-picture, she is surprised by Wandrup, who recognizes in it
his own dead love. "She is thy mother too Ingrid", he cries out. "My
mother, she, and Erhard my brother!"--This is too much for Ingrid; with
an incoherent cry she rushes on the bridge intending to throw herself
over. But Wandrup beseechingly stretches out his arms, crying "Ingrid,
stay, live for thy father". At first the unhappy girl shrinks back,
but seeing the old man's yearning love she sinks on her knees, then
slowly rising, she returns to her father, who folds her in loving
embrace.





Next: Iphigenia In Aulis

Previous: Jessonda



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1286