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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



Le Domino Noir








In three acts by AUBER.

Text by SCRIBE.


This is one of the most charming comic operas, which were ever written
by this master. Graceful archness and elegance of style are its
characteristics, and these lose nothing from the presence of a gay and
easy temper which makes itself felt throughout. The same may be said
of the libretto.

The plot is well worked out and entertaining. The scene is laid in
Madrid in our century.

The Queen of Spain gives a masqued ball, at which our heroine Angela is
present, accompanied by her companion Brigitta. There she is seen by
Horatio di Massarena, a young nobleman, who had met her a year before
at one of these balls and fell in love with, without knowing her.

This time he detains her, but is again unable to discover her real
name, and confessing his love for her, he receives the answer, that she
can be no more than a friend to him. Massarena detains her so long
that the clock strikes the midnight-hour as Angela prepares to seek her
companion. Massarena confesses to having removed Brigitta under some
pretext, and Angela in despair cries out, that she is lost. She is in
reality member of a convent, and destined to be Lady-Abbess, though she
has not yet taken the vows. She is very highly connected, and has
secretly helped Massarena to advance in his career as a
diplomatist.--Great is her anxiety to return in her convent after
midnight, but she declines all escort, and walking alone through the
streets, she comes by chance into the house of Count Juliano, a
gentleman of somewhat uncertain character, and Massarena's friend.
Juliano is just giving a supper to his gay friends and Angela bribes
his housekeeper Claudia, to keep her for the night. She appears before
the guests disguised as an Arragonian waiting-maid, and charms them
all, and particularly Massarena with her grace and coquetry. But as
the young gentlemen begin to be insolent, she disappears, feeling
herself in danger of being recognized. Massarena, discovering in her
the charming black domino, is very unhappy to see her in such
company.--Meanwhile Angela succeeds in getting the keys of the convent
from Gil-Perez, the porter, who had also left his post, seduced by his
love of gormandizing and had come to pay court to Claudia. Angela
troubles his conscience and frightens him with her black mask, and
flies. When she has gone, the house-keeper confesses that her
pretended Arragonian was a stranger, by all appearance a noble lady,
who sought refuge in Juliano's house.

In the third act Angela reaches the convent, but not without having had
some more adventures. Through Brigitta's cleverness her absence has
not been discovered. At length the day has come when she is to be made
Lady-Abbess and she is arrayed in the attire suited to her future high
office, when Massarena is announced to her.--He comes to ask to be
relieved from a marriage with Ursula, Lord Elfort's daughter, who is
destined for him, and who is also an inmate of the convent, but whom he
cannot love. Notwithstanding her disguise he recognizes his beloved
domino, who, happily for both is released by the Queen from her high
mission and permitted to choose a husband.--Of course it is no other,
than the happy Massarena; while Ursula is consoled by being made
Lady-Abbess, a position which well suits her ambitious temper.





Next: Don Carlos

Previous: Il Demonio



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