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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
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Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
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Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
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Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Mignon








In three acts by AMBROISE THOMAS

Text by MICHEL CARRE and JULES BARBIER.


This opera is full of French grace and vivacity, and has been favorably
received in Germany. The authors have used for their libretto Goethe's
celebrated novel "Wilhelm Meister", with its typical figure Mignon as
heroine, though very much altered. The two first acts take place in
Germany.

Lothario, a half demented old man, poorly clad as a wandering minstrel,
seeks his lost daughter Sperata. Mignon comes with a band of gipsies,
who abuse her because she refuses to dance. Lothario advances to
protect her, but Jarno, the chief of the troop, only scorns him, until
a student, Wilhelm Meister steps forth and rescues her, a young actress
named Philine compensating the gipsy for his loss by giving him all her
loose cash. Mignon, grateful for the rescue, falls in love with
Wilhelm and wants to follow and serve him, but the young man, though
delighted with her loveliness and humility is not aware of her love.
Nevertheless he takes her with him. He is of good family, but by a
whim just now stays with a troop of comedians, to whom he takes his
protegee. The coquette Philine loves Wilhelm and has completely
enthralled him by her arts and graces. She awakes bitter jealousy in
Mignon who tries to drown herself, but is hindered by the sweet strains
of Lothario's harp which appeal to the nobler feelings of her nature.
The latter always keeps near her, watching over the lovely child.
He instinctively feels himself attracted towards her; she recalls his
lost daughter to him and he sees her as abandoned and lonely as
himself. Mignon, hearing how celebrated Philine is, wishes that the
palace within which Philine plays, might be struck by lightning, and
Lothario at once executes her wish by setting the house on fire.

While the guests rush into the garden, Philine orders Mignon to fetch
her nosegay, the same flowers, which the thoughtless youth offered to
his mistress Philine. Mignon, reproaching herself for her sinful wish,
at once flies into the burning house, and only afterwards does her
friend Laertes perceive that the theatre has caught fire too.
Everybody thinks Mignon lost, but Wilhelm, rushing into the flames, is
happy enough to rescue her.--

The third act carries us to Italy, where the sick Mignon has been
brought. Wilhelm, having discovered her love, which she reveals in her
delirium, vows to live only for her. Lothario, no longer a minstrel,
receives them as the owner of the palace, from which he had been absent
since the loss of his daughter. While he shows Mignon the relics of
the past, a scarf and a bracelet of corals are suddenly recognized by
her. She begins to remember her infantine prayers, she recognizes the
hall with the marble statues and her mother's picture on the
wall.--With rapture Lothario embraces his long-lost Sperata. But
Mignon's jealous love has found out that Philine followed her,
and she knows no peace until Wilhelm has proved to her satisfaction,
that he loves her best.

At last Philine graciously renounces Wilhelm and turns to Friedrich,
one of her many adorers, whom to his own great surprise she designates
as her future husband. Mignon at last openly avows her passion for
Wilhelm. The people, hearing of the arrival of their master, the
Marquis of Cypriani, alias Lothario, come to greet him with loud
acclamations of joy, which grow still louder, when he presents to them
his daughter Sperata and Wilhelm, her chosen husband.





Next: La Muette De Portici

Previous: The Merry Wives Of Windsor



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