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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Le Prophete








In five acts by GIACOMO MEYERBEER.

Text by SCRIBE.


Though Meyerbeer never again attained the high standard of his
Huguenots, the "Prophet" is not without both striking and
powerful passages; it is even said, that motherly love never spoke in
accents more touching than in this opera. The text is again
historical, but though done by Scribe, it is astonishingly weak and
uninteresting.

The scene is laid in Holland at the time of the wars with the
Anabaptists.

Fides, mother of the hero, John von Leyden, keeps an inn near
Dortrecht. She has just betrothed a young peasant-girl to her son, but
Bertha is a vassal, of the Count of Oberthal and dares not marry
without his permission.

As they set about getting his consent to the marriage, three
Anabaptists, Jonas, Mathisen and Zacharias appear, exciting the people
with their speeches and false promises. While they are preaching,
Oberthal enters, but smitten with Bertha's charms he refuses his
consent to her marriage and carries her off, with Fides as companion.

In the second act we find John, waiting for his bride; as she delays,
the Anabaptists try to win him for their cause, they prophesy him a
crown, but as yet he is not ambitious, and life with Bertha looks
sweeter to him than the greatest honors. As the night comes on, Bertha
rushes in to seek refuge from her pursuer, from whom she has
fled.--Hardly has she hidden herself, when Oberthal enters to claim
her. John refuses his assistance, but when Oberthal threatens to kill
his mother, he gives up Bertha to the Count, while his mother, whose
life he has saved at such a price, asks God's benediction on his
head. Then she retires for the night, and the Anabaptists appear once
more, again trying to win John over. This time they succeed. Without
a farewell to his sleeping mother, John follows the Anabaptists, to be
henceforth their leader, their Prophet, their Messiah.

In the third act we see the Anabaptists' camp, their soldiers have
captured a party of noblemen, who are to pay ransom. They all make
merry and the famous ballet on the ice forms part of the amusements.
In the back-ground we see Muenster, which town is in the hands of Count
Oberthal's father, who refuses to surrender it to the enemy. They
resolve to storm it, a resolution which is heard by young Oberthal, who
has come disguised to the Anabaptists' camp in order to save his father
and the town.

But as a light is struck, he is recognized and is about to be killed,
when John hears from him that Bertha has escaped. She sprang out of
the window to save her honor, and falling into the stream, was saved.
When John learns this, he bids the soldiers spare Oberthal's life, that
he may be judged by Bertha herself.

John has already endured great pangs of conscience at seeing his party
so wild and bloodthirsty. He refuses to go further, but hearing, that
an army of soldiers has broken out of Muenster to destroy the
Anabaptists, he rallies. Praying fervently to God for help and
victory, inspiration comes over him and is communicated to all his
adherents, so that they resolve to storm Muenster. They succeed
and in the fourth act we are in the midst of this town, where we find
Fides, who, knowing that her son has turned Anabaptist, though not
aware of his being their Prophet, is receiving alms to save his soul by
masses. She meets Bertha, disguised in a pilgrim's garb. Both
vehemently curse the Prophet, when this latter appears, to be crowned
in state.

His mother recognizes him, but he disowns her, declaring her mad, and
by strength of will he compels the poor mother to renounce him. Fides,
in order to save his life, avows that she was mistaken and she is led
to prison.

In the last act we find the three Anabaptists, Mathisen, Jonas and
Zacharias together. The Emperor is near the gates of Muenster, and they
resolve to deliver their Prophet into his hands in order to save their
lives.

Fides has been brought into a dungeon, where John visits her to ask her
pardon and to save her. She curses him, but his repentance moves her
so, that she pardons him when he promises to leave his party. At this
moment Bertha enters. She has sworn to kill the false Prophet, and she
comes to the dungeon to set fire to the gunpowder, hidden beneath it.
Fides detains her, but when she recognizes that her bridegroom and the
Prophet are one and the same person, she wildly denounces him for his
bloody deeds and stabs herself in his presence. Then John decides to
die also and after the soldiers have led his mother away, he
himself sets fire to the vault.

Then he appears at the coronation-banquet, where he knows that he is to
be taken prisoner. When Oberthal, the Bishop and all his treacherous
friends are assembled, he bids two of his faithful soldiers close the
gates and fly. This done, the castle is blown into the air with all
its inhabitants. At the last moment Fides rushes in to share her son's
fate, and all are thus buried under the ruins.





Next: The Queen Of Sheba

Previous: Preciosa



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