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Lyric Drama

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



The Cid








In three acts.

Text and Music by PETER CORNELIUS.


After an interval of more than thirty years the Dresden Opera has paid
a debt of honour to the dead composer and gave his finest and best
opera for the first time on January 17th 1899.

This opera had hitherto only been performed in Munich and Weimar.
Though its music is perhaps less fresh and piquant than that of the
Barber of Bagdad by the same composer, yet it has the true ring of
genius and its noble charm ranks high above the ordinary opera of
the present day.

We find in it many leading motives, which would seem to rank Cornelius
amongst Wagner's imitators, but he is very far from being one of these.
All his melodies are original and one of the finest, the Cid-motive,
which accompanies every entrance of this hero, is perfectly entrancing.
The loveliest pearls in the string of music are the funeral march and
Chimene's wail in the first act, her prayer in the second, and the
avowal of her love and the duet that follows in the last act.

The libretto written by Cornelius himself is also far above the
average; its language is uncommonly beautiful and poetic.

The scene is laid in Burgos in Castile in the year 1064. The first act
opens with a large concourse of people, assembled to celebrate Ruy
Diaz' victory over the Moors.

In the midst of their rejoicings a funeral march announces Chimene,
Countess of Lozan, whose father has been slain by Diaz. While she
wildly invokes the King's help against the hero the latter enters,
enthusiastically greeted by the people, who adore in him their
deliverer from the sword of the infidels.

He justifies himself before King Fernando, relating with quiet dignity,
how he killed Count Lozan in open duel to avenge his old father, whose
honour the Count had grossly attacked. Nevertheless he is ready to
defend himself against anybody, who is willing to fight for Donna
Chimene, and for this purpose he throws down his glove, which is taken
up by Alvar Farnez, his friend and companion in arms, who is madly in
love with Chimene.--While they are preparing for the duel the Bishop
Luyn Calvo, an uncle of Diaz, intervenes, entreating his nephew to
desist from further bloodshed and to surrender his sword Tizona into
his the priest's hands. After a hard struggle with himself the hero,
who secretly loves Chimene, yields, and hands his sword to Calvo, who
at once offers it to Chimene, thereby giving the defenceless hero into
her hands.

Exultingly she swears to take vengeance on Diaz, who stands motionless,
looking down with mournful dignity on the woman whom he loves and who
seems to hate him so bitterly.

In the midst of this scene the war cry is heard. The enemy has again
broken into the country and has already taken and burnt the fortress of
Belforad. All crowd round Diaz, beseeching him to save them. While he
stands mute and deprived of his invincible sword, Chimene, mastering
her own grief at the sight of her country's distress, lays down Tizona
at Fernando's feet. Ruy Diaz now receives his sword back from the
hands of the King, and brandishing it high above his head he leads the
warriors forth to freedom or death.

The second act takes place in Chimene's castle. Her women try to
beguile their mistress's sorrow by songs, and when they see her soothed
to quiet, they retire noiselessly. But hardly does she find
herself alone than pain and grief overcome her again. She longs to
avenge her father's death on Diaz, and yet deep in her heart there is a
feeling of great admiration for him. In vain she wrestles with her
feelings, invoking the Allmighty's help to do what is right. In this
mood Alvar finds her and once more assures her of his devotion and
repeats that he will fight with Diaz as soon as the country is freed
from the enemy. He leaves her and night sets in and in the darkness
Diaz steals in, for he cannot resist his heart's desire to see Chimene
once more before the battle. In the uncertain rays of the moonlight
she at first mistakes him for her father's ghost, but when he
pronounces her name she recognizes him, and violently motions him away,
but he falls on his knee and pours out his hopeless love. At last his
passion overcomes all obstacles; she forgives him and at his entreaty
she calls him by his name, saying: "Ruy Diaz be victorious!" Full of
joy he blesses her and goes to join his men who are heard in the
distance calling him to lead them to battle.

The third act is played once more in Burgos.

Diaz has been victorious; the whole army of captives defiles before the
throne and a rejoicing assemblage of nobles and peoples does homage to
the King. Even the Moorish Kings bend the knee voluntarily; they have
been unfortunate, but they have been conquered by the greatest hero of
the world; they are conquered by "the Cid!" When the King asks them
what the name means they tell him that its signification is
"Master"; full of enthusiasm all around adopt this name for their hero.
The Cid will be Diaz' title henceforth, immortal as his glorious star!

The people loudly call for Diaz to appear, but are told that
immediately after the battle Alvar had sent the hero a challenge. At
the same time Alvar enters unhurt, and Chimene who stands near the King
with her women ready to greet the victor, grows white and faint,
believing that Diaz has been killed by Alvar. She impetuously
interrupts the latter, who begins to relate the events, and unable to
control her feelings any longer she pours out her long pent up love for
Diaz, at the same time bewailing the slain hero and swearing
faithfulness to his memory unto death.--"He lives" cries Alvar, and at
this moment the Cid, as we must now call him appears, stormily hailed
by great and small.

Deeply moved he lays down his victorious sword at the feet of his King,
who embraces him pronouncing him Sire of Saldaja, Cardenja and
Belforad. Then he leads him to his lady who sinks into his arms
supremely happy. The Bishop blesses the noble pair and all join in his
prayer, that love may guide them through life and death.





Next: Kirke Circe

Previous: Bearskin



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