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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Lorle








In three acts by ALBAN FOERSTER.

Text by HANS HEINRICH SCHEFSKY.


With this opera its composer has made a lucky hit; it stands far higher
than the "Maidens of Schilda", by dint of the charming subject, founded
on Auerbach's wonderful village-story: Die Frau Professorin. This
romance is so universally known and admired all over Germany, that it
ensures the success of the opera. The music is exceedingly well
adapted to the subject; its best parts are the "Lieder" (songs) which
are often exquisitely sweet, harmonious and refined. They realize
Foerster's prominent strength, and nowhere could they be better placed
than in this sweet and touching story.

Though the libretto is not very carefully written, it is better than
the average performances of this kind, and with poetical
intuition Schefsky has refrained from the temptation, to make it turn
out well, as Charlotte Birch-Pfeiffer has done in her play of L'orle,
which is a weak counterpart of Auerbach's village-tragedy.

The first representation of the opera took place in Dresden on June
18th of 1891; it won the success it truly deserves.

The first act which is laid in a village of the Black Forest,
represents the square before the house of the wealthy Lindenhost. He
wishes his only daughter Lorle to marry a well to do young peasant,
named Balder, who loved her from her childhood. But Lorle rejects him,
having lost her heart to a painter, who had stayed in her father's
house, and who had taken her as a model for a picture of the Madonna,
which adorns the altar of the village church. Lorle's friend Baerbele
guesses her secret, and advises her to consult fate, by wreathing
secretly a garland of blue-bells and reed grass. This wreath she is to
throw into the branches of an oak calling aloud the name of her lover.
If the garland is stopped by the boughs, her wishes are fulfilled, if
it falls back into the girl's hands, she must give up hope for the year.

Both maidens resolve to try their fate on the very same night, which
happens to be St. John's (midsummer-night) the true night for the
working of the charm.

Meanwhile the Hussars arrive, to carry away the newly enlisted
peasants. The sergeant willingly permits a last dance, and all
join in it heartily, but when the hour of parting comes the frightened
Balder hides in an empty barrel. Unfortunately his officer happens to
choose this one barrel for himself, deeming it filled with wine. When
it is laid on the car, the missing recruit is promptly apprehended.

The scene changes now to one of sylvan solitude, through which two
wanderers are sauntering. They are artists, and one of them,
Reinhardt, is attracted to the spot by his longing for the sweet
village-flower, whom he has not forgotten in the whirl of the great
world. Already he sees the windows of his sweet-heart glimmer through
the trees, when suddenly light footsteps cause the friends to hide
behind a large oak-tree. The two maidens who appear are Lorle and
Baerbele. The former prays fervently, then throwing her garland she
shyly calls her lover's name Reinhardt. The latter stepping from
behind the tree skillfully catches the wreath--and the maiden. This
moment decides upon their fates; Reinhardt passionately declares his
love, while Walter amuses himself with pretty Baerbele, whose naive
coquetry pleases him mightily.

The following act introduces us to Reinhardt's studio in a German
residence. A year has gone by since he wooed and won his bride; alas,
he is already tired of her. The siren Maria countess of Matran, with
whom he was enamoured years ago and whose portrait he has just
finished, has again completely bewitched him.



In vain Lorle adorns herself in her bridal attire at the anniversary of
their wedding; the infatuated husband has no eye for her loveliness,
and roughly pushes her from him. Left alone the poor young wife gives
vent to her feelings in an exquisite sigh of longing for her native
country. "Haett' ich verlassen nie dich, meine Haiden." (Would I had
never left thee, o my heath.)

A visit from her dear Baerbele somewhat consoles her and delights
Walter, the faithful house-friend. Balder, Lorle's old play mate,
still recruit, also comes in and gladdens her by a bunch of
heath-flowers. But hardly have they enjoyed their meeting, when the
prince is announced, who desires to have a look at the countess'
portrait. The rustic pair are hastily hidden behind the easel, and
Lorle receives his Royal Highness with artless gracefullness,
presenting him with the flowers she has just received. Her husband is
on thorns, but the prince affably accepts the gift and invites her to a
festival, which is to take place in the evening. Then he looks at the
picture, expressing some disappointment about its execution, which so
vexes the sensitive artist that he roughly pushes the picture from the
easel thereby revealing the two innocents behind it. Great is his
wrath at his wife's imprudence, while the prince exits with the
countess, unable to repress a smile at the unexpected event.

There now ensues a very piquant musical intermezzo, well making up for
the missing overture. The rising curtain reveals a brilliant court
festival. Reinhardt has chosen the countess for his shepherdess,
while Lorle, standing a moment alone and heart-sore, is suddenly chosen
by the Prince as queen of the fete. After a charming gavotte the
guests disperse in the various rooms. Only the countess stays behind
with Reinhardt and so enthralls him, that he forgets honor and wife,
and falls at her feet, stammering words of love and passion.
Unfortunately Lorle witnesses the scene; she staggers forward, charging
her husband with treason. The guests rush to her aid, but this last
stroke is too much for the poor young heart, she sinks down in a dead
faint.

The closing act takes place a year later. Walter and Baerbele are
married, and only Lorle's sad fate mars their happiness. Lorle has
returned to her father's home broken-hearted, and this grief for his
only child has changed the old man sadly.

Again it is midsummernight, and the father is directing his tottering
steps to the old oak, when he is arrested by a solitary wanderer, whom
sorrow and remorse have also aged considerably. With disgust and
loathing he recognizes his child's faithless husband, who comes to
crave pardon from the wife he so deeply wronged. Alas, he only comes,
to see her die.

Lorle's feeble steps are also guided by her friends to the old oak, her
favorite resting-place. There she finds her last wish granted; it is
to see Reinhardt once more, before she dies and to pardon him. The
luckless husband rushes to her feet and tries vainly to restrain
the fast-ebbing life. With the grateful sigh "he loves me", she sinks
dead into his arms, while a sweet and solemn choir in praise of St.
John's night concludes the tragedy.





Next: Love's Battle

Previous: Lohengrin



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