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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Philemon And Baucis








In two acts by CHARLES GOUNOD.

Text by JULES BARBIER and MICHEL CARRE, with an intermezzo.


This is a truly delightful musical composition and though unpretending
and not on the level of Gounod's "Margaretha", it does not deserve to
be forgotten.

The libretto is founded on the well-known legend.

In the first act Jupiter comes to Philemon's hut, accompanied by Vulkan
to seek refuge from a storm, which the god himself has caused. He has
come to earth to verify Mercury's tale of the people's badness, and
finding the news only too true, besides being uncourteously received by
the people around, he is glad to meet with a kindly welcome at
Philemon's door.

This worthy old man lives in poverty, but in perfect content with his
wife Baucis, to whom he has been united in bonds of love for sixty long
years. Jupiter, seeing at once, that the old couple form an exception
to the evil rule, resolves to spare them, and to punish only the bad
folks. The gods partake of the kind people's simple meal, and
Jupiter, changing the milk into wine, is recognized by Baucis, who is
much awed by the discovery. But Jupiter reassures her and promises to
grant her only wish, which is, to be young again with her husband, and
to live the same life. The god sends them to sleep, and then begins
the intermezzo.

Phrygians are seen reposing after a festival, bacchants rush in and the
wild orgies begin afresh. The divine is mocked and pleasure praised as
the only god. Vulcan comes, sent by Jupiter to warn them, but as they
only laugh at him, mocking Olympus and the gods, Jupiter himself
appears to punish the sinners. An awful tempest arises, sending
everything to rack and ruin.--

In the second act Philemon's hut is changed into a palace; he awakes to
find himself and his wife young again. Jupiter, seeing Baucis' beauty,
orders Vulkan to keep Philemon apart, while he courts her. Baucis
though determined to remain faithful to her Philemon, feels
nevertheless flattered at the god's condescension, and dares not refuse
him a kiss. Philemon, appearing on the threshold sees it, and
violently reproaches her and his guest, and though Baucis suggests who
the latter is, the husband does not feel in the least inclined to share
his wife's love even with a god. The first quarrel takes place between
the couple, and Vulkan hearing it, consoles himself with the reflection
that he is not the only one, to whom a fickle wife causes sorrow.
Philemon bitterly curses Jupiter's gift; he wishes his wrinkles back,
and with them his peace of mind. Throwing down Jupiter's statue,
he leaves his wife to the god. Baucis, replacing the image, which
happily is made of bronze, sorely repents her behaviour towards her
beloved husband. Jupiter finds her weeping, and praying that the gods
may turn their wrath upon herself alone. The god promises to pardon
both, if she is willing to listen to his love. She agrees to the
bargain on the condition namely that Jupiter shall grant her a favor.
He consents, and she entreats him to make her old again. Philemon,
listening behind the door, rushes forward to embrace the true wife and
joins his entreaties to hers. Jupiter, seeing himself caught, would
fain be angry, but their love conquers his wrath. He does not recall
his gift, but giving them his benediction, he promises never more to
cross their happiness.





Next: The Three Pintos

Previous: Pagliacci



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