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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Iphigenia In Tauris








In four acts by GLUCK.

Text by GUILLARD.


Gluck's Iphigenia stands highest among his dramatic compositions. It
is eminently classic and so harmoniously finished, that Herder called
its music sacred.

The libretto is excellent. It follows pretty exactly the Greek
original.

Iphigenia, King Agamemnon's daughter, who has been saved by the goddess
Diana (or Artemis) from death at the altar of Aulis, has been carried
in a cloud to Tauris, where she is compelled to be High-priestess in
the temple of the barbarous Scythians. There we find her, after having
performed her cruel service for fifteen years.--Human sacrifices
are required, but more than once she has saved a poor stranger from
this awful lot.

Iphigenia is much troubled by a dream, in which she saw her father
deadly wounded by her mother and herself about to kill her brother
Orestes. She bewails her fate, in having at the behest of Thoas, King
of the Scythians, to sacrifice two strangers, who have been thrown on
his shores. Orestes and his friend Pylades, for these are the
strangers, are led to death, loaded with chains.

Iphigenia, hearing that they are her countrymen, resolves to save at
least one of them, in order to send him home to her sister Electra.
She does not know her brother Orestes, who having slain his mother, has
fled, pursued by the furies, but an inner voice makes her choose him as
a messenger to Greece. A lively dispute arises between the two
friends; at last Orestes prevails upon Iphigenia to spare his friend,
by threatening to destroy himself with his own hands, his life being a
burden to him. Iphigenia reluctantly complies with his request, giving
the message for her sister to Pylades.

In the third act Iphigenia vainly tries to steel her heart against her
victim. At last she seizes the knife, but Orestes' cry: "So you also
were pierced by the sacrificial steel, O my sister Iphigenia!" arrests
her; the knife falls from her hands, and there ensues a touching scene
of recognition.

Meanwhile Thoas, who has heard that one of the strangers was about to
depart, enters the temple with his body-guard, and though Iphigenia
tells him, that Orestes is her brother and entreats him so spare
Agamemnon's son, Thoas determines to sacrifice him and his sister
Iphigenia as well. But his evil designs are frustrated by Pylades,
who, returning with several of his countrymen, stabs the King of
Tauris. The goddess Diana herself appears and helping the Greeks in
their fight, gains for them the victory. Diana declares herself
appeased by Orestes' repentance and allows him to return to Mykene with
his sister, his friend and all his followers.





Next: Joseph In Egypt

Previous: Iphigenia In Aulis



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