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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Rigoletto








In three acts by VERDI.

Text by PIAVE from VICTOR HUGO'S drama: "Le roi s'amuse".


No opera has become popular in so short a time as Rigoletto in Italy.
The music is very winning and is, like all that Verdi has
written, full of exquisite melodies.

In Germany it has not met with the same favor, which is due in great
part to its awful libretto, which is a faithful copy of Hugo's drama,
and developed in a truly dramatic manner. The subject is however
rather disgusting. Excepting Gilda, we do not meet with one noble
character.

The Duke of Mantua, a wild and debauched youth, covets every girl or
woman he sees, and is assisted in his vile purposes by his jester,
Rigoletto an ugly, hump-backed man. We meet him first helping the Duke
to seduce the wife of Count Ceprano, and afterwards the wife of Count
Monterone. Both husbands curse the vile Rigoletto and swear to be
avenged. Monterone especially, appearing like a ghost in the midst of
a festival, hurls such a fearful curse at them, that Rigoletto shudders.

This bad man has one tender point, it is his blind love for his
beautiful daughter Gilda, whom he brings up carefully, keeping her
hidden from the world and shielding her from all wickedness.

But the cunning Duke discovers her and gains her love under the assumed
name of a student, named Gualtier Malde.

Gilda is finally carried off by Ceprano and two other courtiers, aided
by her own father, who holds the ladder believing that Count Ceprano's
wife is to be the victim.--A mask blinds Rigoletto and he discovers,
too late, by Gilda's cries that he has been duped. Gilda is
brought to the Duke's palace.--Rigoletto appears in the midst of the
courtiers to claim Gilda, and then they hear that she, whom they
believed to be his mistress, is his daughter, for whose honor he is
willing to sacrifice everything.--Gilda enters and though she sees that
she has been deceived, she implores her father to pardon the Duke, whom
she still loves. But Rigoletto vows vengeance, and engages Sparafucile
to stab the Duke. Sparafucile decoys him into his inn, where his
sister Maddalena awaits him. She too is enamoured of the Duke, who
makes love to her, as to all young females, and she entreats her
brother to have mercy on him. Sparafucile declares that he will wait
until midnight, and will spare him, if another victim should turn up
before then. Meanwhile Rigoletto persuades his daughter to fly from
the Duke's pursuit, but before he takes her away, he wants to show her
lover's fickleness, in order to cure her of her love.

She comes to the inn in masculine attire, and hearing the discourse
between Sparafucile and his sister, resolves to save her lover. She
enters the inn and is instantly put to death, placed in a sack and
given to Rigoletto, who proceeds to the river to dispose of the corpse.
At this instant he hears the voice of the Duke, who passes by, singing
a frivolous tune. Terrified, Rigoletto opens the sack, and recognizes
his daughter, who is yet able to tell him, that she gave her life for
that of her seducer and then expires. With an awful cry, the
unhappy father sinks upon the corpse. Count Monterone's curse has been
fulfilled.





Next: Robert Le Diable

Previous: Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes



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