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Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Orfeo E Eurydice








In three acts by GLUCK.

Text by RANIERO DI CALZABIGI.


This opera is the oldest of all we possess in our repertoire. Gluck
had already written more than forty operas, of which we do not even
know the names now, when he composed his Orfeo, breaking with the old
Italian traditions and showing a new and more natural taste. All the
charm of Italian melody is still to be found in this composition, but
it is blent with real feeling, united to great strength of expression
and its value is enhanced by a total absence of all those superfluous
warbles and artificial ornaments, which filled the Italian operas of
that time. The libretto, taken from the old and beautiful Greek
tragedy, is as effective as the music.



Orpheus, the celebrated Greek musician and singer has lost his wife
Eurydice. His mournful songs fill the groves where he laments, and
with them he touches the hearts not only of his friends but of the
gods. On his wife's grave Amor appears to him, and bids him descend
into Hades, where he is to move the Furies and the Elysian shadows with
his sweet melodies, and win back from them his lost wife.

He is to recover her on a condition, which is, that he never casts a
look on her on their return to earth, for if he fail in this, Eurydice
will be for ever lost to him.

Taking his lyre and casque Orpheus promises obedience and with renewed
hope sallies forth on his mission. The second act represents the gates
of Erebus, from which flames arise. Orpheus is surrounded by furies
and demons, who try to frighten him; but he, nothing daunted, mollifies
them by his sweet strains, and they set free the passage to Elysium,
where Orpheus has to win the happy shadows. He beholds Eurydice among
them, veiled, the happy shadows readily surrender her to him, escorting
the pair to the gates of their happy vale.

The third act beholds the spouses on their way back to earth. Orpheus
holds Eurydice by the hand, drawing the reluctant wife on, but without
raising his eyes to her face, on and on through the winding and obscure
paths, which lead out of the infernal regions. Notwithstanding his
protestations of love and his urgent demands to her to follow
him, Eurydice never ceases to implore him to cast a single look on her,
threatening him with her death, should he not fulfil her wish.
Orpheus, forbidden to tell her the reason of his strange behaviour,
long remains deaf to her cruel complaints, but at last he yields, and
looks back, only to see her expire under his gaze. Overwhelmed by
grief and despair Orpheus draws his sword to destroy himself, when Amor
appears, and stays the fatal stroke.

In pity for Orpheus' love and constancy he reanimates Eurydice
(contrary however to the letter of the Greek tragedy) and the act
closes with a beautiful chorus sung in Amor's praise.





Next: Othello

Previous: Oberon



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