VIEW THE MOBILE VERSION of www.operatic.ca Informational Site Network Informational
Privacy
     Home - All Operas - Opera Stories - Opera History - Opera Physiology

Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



La Somnambula








In two acts by VINCENZO BELLINI.

Text by FELICE ROMANI.


This opera is decidedly of the best of Bellini's muse. Though it does
not reach the standard of Norma, its songs are so rich and melodious,
that they seem to woo the ear and cannot be heard without pleasure.

Add to these advantages a really fine as well as touching libretto, and
it may be easily understood, why the opera has not yet disappeared from
the stage repertory, though composed more than fifty years ago.

It is a simple village-peasant story, which we have to relate. The
scene of action is a village in Switzerland, where the rich
farmer Elvino has married a poor orphan, Amina. The ceremony has taken
place at the magistrate's, and Elvino is about to obtain the sanction
of the church to his union, when the owner of the castle, Count
Rudolph, who fled from home in his boyhood, returns most unexpectedly
and, at once making love to Amina, excites the bridegroom's jealousy.
Lisa, the young owner of a little inn, who wants Elvino for herself and
disdains the devotion of Alexis, a simple peasant, tries to avenge
herself on her happy rival. Lisa is a coquette and flirts with the
Count, whom the judge recognizes. While she yet prates with him, the
door opens and Amina enters, walking in her sleep and calling for
Elvino. Lisa conceals herself, but forgets her handkerchief. The
Count, seeing Amina's condition and awed by her purity quits the room,
where Amina lies down, always in deep sleep. Just then the people,
having heard of the Count's arrival, come to greet him and find Amina
instead. At the same moment Elvino summoned by Lisa rushes in, and
finding his bride in the Count's room, turns away from her in disdain,
snatching his wedding-ring from her finger in his wrath, and utterly
disbelieving Amina's protestations of innocence and the Count's
assurances. Lisa succeeds in attracting Elvino's notice and he
promises to marry her.

The Count once more tries to persuade the angry bridegroom of his
bride's innocence, but without result, when Teresa, Amina's
foster-mother, shows Lisa's handkerchief, which was found in the
Count's room. Lisa reddens, and Elvino knows not whom he shall
believe, when all of a sudden Amina is seen, emerging from a window of
the mill, walking in a trance, and calling for her bridegroom in most
touching accents.

All are convinced of her innocence, when they see her in this state of
somnambulism, in which she crosses a very narrow bridge without falling.

Elvino himself replaces the wedding-ring on her finger, and she awakes
from her trance in his arms. Everybody is happy at the turn which
things have taken; Elvino asks Amina's forgiveness and leaves Lisa to
her own bitter reflections.





Next: The Taming Of The Shrew

Previous: Silvana



Add to del.icio.us Add to Reddit Add to Digg Add to Del.icio.us Add to Google Add to Twitter Add to Stumble Upon
Add to Informational Site Network
Report
Privacy
SHAREADD TO EBOOK


Viewed 1314