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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



La Figlia Del Reggimento








In two acts by GAETANO DONIZETTI.

Text by ST. GEORGE and BAYARD.


This opera is one of the few of Donizetti's numerous works, which still
retain their attraction for the theatre-visitor, the others are his
Lucrezia Borgia and Lucia di Lammermoor.

The "Daughter of the Regiment" happily combines Italian richness of
melody with French "esprit" and French sallies, and hence the continued
charm of this almost international music.

The libretto can be accounted good.



The scene in the first act is laid near Bologna in the year 1815, the
second act in the castle of the Marchesa di Maggiorivoglio.

Mary, a vivandiere, has been found and educated by a French sergeant,
named Sulpice, and therefore belongs in a sense to his regiment, which
is on a campaign in Italy. She is called the "daughter" of the
regiment, which has adopted her, and she has grown up, a bright and
merry girl, full of pluck and spirit, the pet and delight of the whole
regiment.

Tonio, a young Swiss, who has fallen in love with Mary, is believed by
the grenadiers to be a spy, and is about to be hanged. But Mary,
knowing that he has only come to see her, tells them that he lately
saved her life, when she was in danger of falling over a precipice.
This changes everything and on his expressing a desire to become one of
them, the grenadiers suffer the Swiss to enlist into their company.
After the soldiers' departure he confesses his love to Mary, who
returns it heartily. The soldiers agree to give their consent, when
the Marchesa di Maggiorivoglio appears, and by a letter once affixed to
the foundling Mary, addressed to a Marchesa of the same name and
carefully kept by Sulpice, it is proved that Mary is the Marchesa's
niece. Of course this noble lady refuses her consent to a marriage
with the low-born Swiss and claims Mary from her guardian. With tears
and laments Mary takes leave of her regiment and her lover, who at once
decides to follow her. But he has enlisted as soldier and is
forbidden to leave the ranks. Sulpice and his whole regiment curse the
Marchesa, who thus carries away their joy.

In the second act Mary is in her aunt's castle. She has masters of
every kind for her education in order to become a lady comme il faut,
but she cannot forget her freedom, and her dear soldiers, and instead
of singing solfeggios and cavatinas, she is caught warbling her
"Rataplan", to the Marchesa's grief and sorrow. Nor can she cease to
think of Tonio, and only after a great struggle has she been induced to
promise her hand to a nobleman, when she suddenly hears the
well-beloved sound of drums and trumpets. It is her own regiment with
Tonio as their leader, for he has been made an officer on account of
his courage and brave behaviour. Hoping that his altered position may
turn the Marchesa's heart in his favor, he again asks for Mary, but his
suit is once more rejected. Then he proposes flight, but the Marchesa
detecting his plan, reveals to Mary that she is not her niece, but her
own daughter, born in early wedlock with an officer far beneath her in
rank, who soon after died in battle. This fact she has concealed from
her family, but as it is now evident that she has closer ties with
Mary, the poor girl dares not disobey her, and, though broken-hearted,
consents to renounce Tonio.

The Marchesa invites a large company of guests to celebrate her
daughter's betrothal to the son of a neighboring duchess. But Mary's
faithful grenadiers suddenly appear to rescue her from those
hateful ties, and astonish the whole company by their recital of Mary's
early history. The obedient maiden however, submissive to her fate, is
about to sign the marriage contract, when at last the Marchesa, touched
by her obedience and her sufferings, conquers her own pride and
consents to the union of her daughter with Tonio. Sulpice and his
soldiers burst out into loud shouts of approbation, and the highborn
guests retire silently and disgusted.





Next: The Flying Dutchman

Previous: Fidelio



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