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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Gustavus The Third
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



Iphigenia In Aulis








In three acts by GLUCK.

Text of the original rearranged by R. WAGNER.


This opera, though it does not stand from the point of view of the
artist on the same level with Iphigenia in Tauris, deserves
nevertheless to be represented on every good stage. It may be called
the first part of the tragedy, and Iphigenia in Tauris very beautifully
completes it. The music is sure to be highly relished by a cultivated
hearer, characterized as it is by a simplicity which often rises into
grandeur and nobility of utterance.

The first scene represents Agamemnon rent by a conflict between his
duty and his fatherly love; the former of which demands the sacrifice
of his daughter, for only then will a favorable wind conduct the Greeks
safely to Ilion. Kalchas, the High-priest of Artemis, appears to
announce her dreadful sentence. Alone with the King, Kalchas vainly
tries to induce the unhappy father to consent to the sacrifice.

Meanwhile Iphigenia, who has not received Agamemnon's message, which
ought to have prevented her undertaking the fatal journey, arrives with
her mother Klytemnestra. They are received with joy by the people.
Agamemnon secretly informs his spouse, that Achilles, Iphigenia's
betrothed, has proved unworthy of her, and that she is to return to
Argos at once.--Iphigenia gives way to her feelings. Achilles appears,
the lovers are soon reconciled and prepare to celebrate their nuptials.



In the second act Iphigenia is adorned for her wedding and Achilles
comes to lead her to the altar, when Arkas, Agamemnon's messenger,
informs them that death awaits Iphigenia.

Klytemnestra in despair appeals to Achilles and the bridegroom swears
to protect Iphigenia. She alone is resigned in the belief, that it is
her father's will that she should face this dreadful duty. Achilles
reproaches Agamemnon wildly and leaves the unhappy father a prey to
mental torture. At last he decides to send Arkas at once to Mykene
with mother and daughter and to hide them there, until the wrath of the
goddess be appeased. But it is too late.

In the third act the people assemble before the Royal tent and with
much shouting and noise demand the sacrifice. Achilles in vain
implores Iphigenia to follow him. She is ready to be sacrificed, while
he determines to kill anyone, who dares touch his bride. Klytemnestra
then tries everything in her power to save her. She offers herself in
her daughter's stead and finding it of no avail at last sinks down in a
swoon. The daughter, having bade her an eternal farewell, with quiet
dignity allows herself to be led to the altar. When her mother awakes,
she rages in impotent fury; then she hears the people's hymn to the
goddess, and rushes out to die with her child.--The scene changes.--The
High-priest at the altar of Artemis is ready to pierce the innocent
victim. A great tumult arises, Achilles with his native Thessalians
makes his way through the crowd, in order to save Iphigenia, who
loudly invokes the help of the goddess. But at this moment a loud
thunder-peal arrests the contending parties, and when the mist, which
has blinded all, has passed, Artemis herself is seen in a cloud with
Iphigenia kneeling before her.

The goddess announces that it is Iphigenia's high mind, which she
demands and not her blood, she wishes to take her into a foreign land,
where she may be her priestess and atone for the sins of the blood of
Atreus.

A wind favorable to the fleet has risen, and the people filled with
gratitude and admiration behold the vanishing cloud and praise the
goddess.





Next: Iphigenia In Tauris

Previous: Ingrid



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