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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Frauenlob








In three acts by REINHOLD BECKER.

Text by FRANZ KOPPEL-ELLFELD.


Becker, the well-known Dresden composer, has long won name and fame by
his beautiful songs, which may be heard all over the continent. He is
a first-rate "Liedermeister", and great was the excitement, with which
his friends looked forward to his first opera.

Their expectations were not deceived, for the opera was put on the
stage in Dresden on Dec. 8th 1892, and was received with unanimous
applause.

Becker is not one of those high-flown artists who elevate us to the
skies; he rather lacks dramatic strength; the lyric element is his
strong point. By the Lied he finds his way direct to the hearts of his
hearers, and where ever this could be woven into the action of his
opera, he has done it with subtle taste. Tilda's dancing-air in the
first act, the evening-song, sung while the people are gliding down the
Rhine in boats, whose lovely variations remind us of quaint old airs of
bye-gone days,--the chorus of the stone-masons in the second act, and
the love-duet in the third are brilliant gems in Becker's music.

The libretto rivals the best of its kind.

The scene is laid near and in Maintz in the year 1308; it takes place
during the reign of Ludwig, Emperor of Bavaria.

Heinrich Frauenlob, the famous minstrel, who had won his name by his
songs in women's praise, is by birth a knight, Dietherr zur Meise.
Years ago he slew the Truchsess of Maintz in self-defence, and having
therefore become an outlaw, had entered the service of the Emperor. In
the beginning of the opera we find him however near Maintz, where he
stays as a guest at his friend's Wolf's castle. He takes part in the
people's festival on Midsummer day, deeming himself unknown.

When the customary St. John's fire is lighted, no one dares leap over
it for fear of an old gipsy's prophesy, which threatened with sudden
death the first who should attempt it. Frauenlob, disregarding the
prophesy, persuades Hildegund, Ottker von Scharfenstein's fair ward, to
venture through the fire with him. Hildegund is the slain Truchsess'
daughter, and has sworn, to wed the avenger of her father's death, but
each lover is unconscious of the other's name. The gipsy Sizyga alone,
who had been betrayed in her youth by Frauenlob's father, recognizes
the young knight, and though he has only just saved the old hag from
the people's fury, she wishes to avenge her wrongs on him. To this end
she betrays the secret of Frauenlob's birth to Hildegund's suitor,
Servazio di Bologna, who is highly jealous of this new rival, and
determines to lay hands on him, as soon as he enters the gates of
Maintz.--Frauenlob, though warned by Sizyga, enters Maintz attracted by
Hildegund's sweet graces; he is determined to confess everything, and
then to fly with her, should she be willing to follow him.



The second act opens with a fine song of the warder of the tower. The
city awakes, the stonemasons assemble, ready to greet the Emperor,
whose arrival is expected. Tilda, Hildegund's friend, and daughter to
Klas, chief of the stone-masons is going to church, but on her way she
is accosted by the knight Wolf, who has lost his heart to her, and now,
forgetting his plan to look for Frauenlob, follows the lovely
damsel.--When Frauenlob comes up, and sees again the well-known places
of his youth, he is deeply touched, but seeing his lady love step on
the balcony and soon after come down to enter the dome, he waylays her,
imploring her, to fly with him. At this moment Servazio, who has lain
in wait, steps forth with officers, who capture Frauenlob. Servazio
now reveals the singer's secret and Hildegund hears that her lover is
her father's murderer. Though Frauenlob tells Hildegund, that he
killed her father in self-defence, she turns from him shuddering.
Feeling that all hopes of his future happiness are at an end, he wishes
to atone for his deed by death, refusing the help of Wolf, who comes up
with his men, to release him. But the stone-masons, having recognized
the celebrated minstrel, with whose song they are about to greet the
Emperor, decide to invoke the latter's clemency.

In the third act the citizens of Maintz hail the Emperor, after which
Frauenlob's cause is brought before him. The whole population demands
his pardon, and the monarch, who loves the singer, would fain
liberate him, had not Servazio roughly insisted on the culprit's
punishment. Uncertain, what to do, the Emperor receives a long
procession of ladies with Tilda at its head, who all beseech pardon for
Frauenlob. At last the Emperor calls for Hildegund, leaving in her
hands the destiny of the prisoner. Left alone with him the latter,
prepared to die, only craves her pardon. After a hard struggle with
her conscience, love conquers and she grants him pardon. When the
Emperor reenters with his suite, to hear the sentence, they find the
lovers in close embrace. To the joy of everybody the Monarch sanctions
the union and orders the nuptials to be celebrated at once. Another
pair, Wolf and Tilda are also made happy. But Servazio vows vengeance.
Sizyga, having secretly slipped a powder into his hands, he pours it
into a cup of wine, which he presents to Frauenlob as a drink of
reconciliation. The Emperor handing the goblet to Hildegund, bids her
drink to her lover. Testing it, she at once feels its deadly effect.
Frauenlob, seeing his love stagger, snatches the cup from her emptying
it at one draught. He dies, still praising the Emperor and women,
breathing the name of his bride with his last breath. Servazio is
captured, and while Hildegund's body is strewn with roses, the wailing
women of Maintz carry their beloved minstrel to his grave.--





Next: Der Freischuetz

Previous: Fra Diavolo



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