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Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Carmen








In four acts by GEORGE BIZET.


This opera is essentially Spanish. The music throughout has a southern
character and is passionate and original to a high degree.

Carmen, the heroine is a Spanish gipsy, fickle and wayward, but endowed
with all the wild graces of her nation. She is adored by her people,
and so it is not to be wondered at, that she has many of the stronger
sex at her feet. She is betrothed to Don Jose, a brigadier of the
Spanish army; of course he is one out of many; she soon grows tired of
him, and awakens his jealousy by a thousand caprices and cruelties.

Don Jose has another bride, sweet and lovely, Micaela, waiting for him
at home, but she is forgotten as soon as he sees the proud gipsy.

Micaela seeks him out, bringing to him the portrait and the benediction
of his mother, ay, even her kiss, which she gives him with blushes.
His tenderness is gone, however, so far as Micaela is concerned, as
soon as he casts one look into the lustrous eyes of Carmen. This
passionate creature has involved herself in a quarrel and wounded one
of her companions, a laborer in a cigarette manufactory. She is to be
taken to prison, but Don Jose lets her off, promising to meet her in
the evening at an inn kept by a man named Lillas Pastia, where they are
to dance the Seguedilla.

In the second act we find them there together, with the whole band of
gipsies. Don Jose, more and more infatuated by Carmen's charms, is
willing to join the vagabonds, who are at the same time smugglers. He
accompanies them in a dangerous enterprise of this kind, but no sooner
has he submitted to sacrifice love and honor for the gipsy, than she
begins to tire of his attentions. Jose has pangs of conscience, he
belongs to another sphere of society and his feelings are of a softer
kind than those of nature's unruly child. She transfers her affections
to a bull-fighter named Escamillo, another of her suitors, who returns
her love more passionately. A quarrel ensues between the two rivals.
Escamillo's knife breaks and he is about to be killed by Don Jose, when
Carmen intervenes, holding back his arm. Don Jose, seeing that she has
duped him, now becomes her deadly foe, filled with undying hatred and
longing for revenge.

Micaela, the tender-hearted maiden, who follows him everywhere like a
guardian-angel, reminds him of his lonely mother, everybody advises him
to let the fickle Carmen alone,--Carmen who never loved the same man
for more than six weeks. But in vain, till Micaela tells him of
the dying mother, asking incessantly for her son; then at last he
consents to go with her, but not without wild imprecations on his rival
and his faithless love.

In the fourth act we find ourselves in Madrid. There is to be a
bull-fight; Escamillo, its hero, has invited the whole company to be
present in the circus.

Don Jose appears there too, trying for the last time to regain his
bride. Carmen, though warned by a fellow gipsy, Frasquita, knows no
fear. She meets her old lover outside the arena, where he tries hard
to touch her heart. He kneels at her feet, vowing never to forsake her
and to be one of her own people, but Carmen, though wayward, is neither
a coward nor a liar, and boldly declares that her affections are given
to the bull-fighter, whose triumphs are borne to their ears on the
shouts of the multitude. Almost beside himself with love and rage Jose
seizes her hand and attempts to drag her away, but she escapes from
him, and throwing the ring, Jose's gift, at his feet, rushes to the
door of the arena.--He overtakes her however and just as the trumpets
announce Escamillo's victory, in a perfect fury of despair he stabs her
through the heart, and the victorious bull-fighter finds his beautiful
bride a corpse.





Next: Cavalleria Rusticana

Previous: The Devil's Part



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