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Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Don Carlos








In four acts by VERDI.

Text by MERY and CAMILLA DU LOCLE.


This opera is one of the first of Verdi's. It was half forgotten, when
being suddenly recalled to the stage it met with considerable success.
The music is fine and highly dramatic in many parts.

The scene of action lies in Spain. Don Carlos, Crown-prince of Spain
comes to the convent of St. Just, where his grand-father, the Emperor
Charles the Fifth has just been buried. Carlos bewails his separation
from his step-mother, Elizabeth of Valois, whom he loves with a sinful
passion. His friend, the Marquis Posa reminds him of his duty and
induces him to leave Spain for Flanders, where an unhappy nation sighs
under the cruel rule of King Philip's governors.--Carlos has an
interview with the Queen, but beside himself with grief he again
declares his love, though having resolved only to ask for her
intervention with the King, on behalf of his mission to Flanders.
Elizabeth asks him to think of duty and dismisses him. Just then her
jealous husband enters, and finding her lady of honor, Countess
Aremberg, absent, banishes the latter from Spain. King Philip favors
Posa with his particular confidence, though the latter is secretly the
friend of Carlos, who is ever at variance with his wicked father. Posa
uses his influence with the King for the best of the people, and
Philip, putting entire confidence in him, orders him to watch his wife.

The second act represents a fete in the royal gardens at Madrid, where
Carlos mistakes the Princess Eboli for the Queen and betrays his
unhappy love. The Princess, loving Carlos herself, and having nurtured
hopes of her love being responded to, takes vengeance. She possesses
herself of a casket in which the Queen keeps Carlos' portrait, a
love-token from her maiden-years, and surrenders it to Philip. The
King, though conscious of his wife's innocence, is more than ever
jealous of his son, and seeks for an occasion to put him out of the
way. It is soon found, when Carlos defies him at an autodafe of
heretics. Posa himself is obliged to deprive Carlos of his sword, and
the latter is imprisoned. The King has an interview with the
Grand-Inquisitor, who demands the death of Don Carlos, asserting him to
be a traitor to his country. As Philip demurs, the priest asks Posa's
life as the more dangerous of the two. The King, who never loved a
human being except Posa, the pure-hearted Knight, yields to the
power of the church.

In the following scene Elizabeth, searching for her casket, is accused
of infidelity by her husband. The Princess Eboli, seeing the trouble
her mischievous jealousy has brought upon her innocent mistress,
penitently confesses her fault and is banished from court. In the last
scene of the third act Carlos is visited by Posa, who explains to him,
that he has only imprisoned him in order to save him, and that he has
announced to the King, that it was himself, Posa, who excited rebellion
in Flanders. While they speak, Posa is shot by an arquebusier of the
royal guard; Philip enters the cell to present his sword to Carlos, but
the son turns from his father with loathing and explains his friend's
pious fraud. While Philip bewails the loss of the best man in Spain,
loud acclamations are heard from the people, who hearing that their
prince is in danger desire to see him.

In the last act the Queen, who promised Posa to watch over Carlos,
meets him once more in the convent of St. Just. They are surprised by
the King, who approaches, accompanied by the Grand-Inquisitor, and into
his hands the unhappy Carlos is at last delivered.





Next: Don Juan

Previous: Le Domino Noir



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