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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Don Juan








In two acts by MOZART.

Text by DA PONTE.


Don Juan is Mozart's most beautiful opera; we may even say, that it is
the greatest work of this kind, which was ever written by a German
musician. The text too, written by Mozart's friend, is far above the
level of ordinary opera-texts.

The hero, spoilt by fortune and blase, is ever growing more reckless.
He even dares to attack the virtue of Donna Anna, one of the first
ladies of a city in Spain, of which her father, an old Spanish Grandee,
as noble and as strict in virtue as Don Juan is oversatiated and
frivolous, is governor. The old father coming forward to help his
beloved daughter, with drawn dagger attacks Don Juan, who compelled to
defend himself, has the misfortune to stab his assailant.

Donna Anna, a lady not only noble and virtuous, but proud and
high-spirited, vows to avenge her father's death. Though betrothed to
a nobleman, named Octavio, she will never know any peace until her
father, of whose death she feels herself the innocent cause, is
avenged. Her only hope is death, and in that she offers the liveliest
contrast to her betrothed, who shows himself a gentleman of good temper
and qualities, but of a mind too weak for his lady's high-flown courage
and truly tragic character. Though Octavio wants to avenge Donna
Anna's father, he would do it only to please her. His one aim is
marriage with her. Her passionate feelings he does not understand.

Don Juan, pursued not only by Donna Anna, but also by his own neglected
bride, Donna Elvira, tries to forget himself in debauches and
extravagances. His servant Leporello, in every manner the real
counterpart of his master, is his aider and abettor. A more witty, a
more amusing figure does not exist. His fine sarcasm brings Don Juan's
character into bold relief; they complement and explain each-other.

But Don Juan, passing from one extravagance to another, sinks deeper;
everything he tries begins to fail him, and his doom approaches.--He
begins to amuse himself with Zerlina, the young bride of a peasant,
named Masetto, but each time, when he seems all but successful in his
aim of seducing the little coquette, his enemies, who have united
themselves against him, interfere and present a new foe in the person
of the bridegroom, the plump and rustic Masetto. At last Don Juan is
obliged to take refuge from the hatred of his pursuers. His flight
brings him to the grave of the dead governor, in whose memory a
life-size statue has been erected in his own park. Excited to the
highest pitch and almost beside himself, Don Juan even mocks the dead;
he invites him to a supper. The statue moves its head in acceptance of
the dreadful invitation of the murderer.

Towards evening Donna Elvira comes to see him, willing to pardon
everything, if only her lover will repent. She fears for him and
for his fate, she does not ask for his love, but only for the
repentance of his follies, but all is in vain. The half-drunken Don
Juan laughs at her, and so she leaves him alone. Then the ghostly
guest, the statue of the governor enters. He too tries to move his
host's conscience; he fain would save him in the last hour. Don Juan
remains deaf to those warnings of a better self, and so he incurs his
doom. The statue vanishes, the earth opens and the demons of hell
devour Don Juan and his splendid palace.





Next: Don Pasquale

Previous: Don Carlos



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