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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



The Golden Cross








In two acts by IGNAZ BRULL.

Text by MOSENTHAL.


Brull, born at Prossnitz in Moravia, Nov. 7th, 1846, received his
musical education in Vienna and is well known as a good pianist. He
has composed different operas, of which however the above-mentioned is
the only popular one.

This charming little opera, which rendered its composer famous, has
passed beyond the frontiers of Germany and is now translated into
several languages.

The text is skillfully arranged, and so combined as to awaken our
interest.



The scene is laid in a village near Melun in the years between 1812 and
15.

Nicolas (or Cola) Pariset, an innkeeper, is betrothed to his cousin
Therese. Unfortunately just on his wedding-day a sergeant, named
Bombardon, levies him for the army, which is to march against the
Russians. Vainly does Therese plead for her betrothed, and equally in
vain is it that she is joined in her pleading by Nicolas' sister
Christine. The latter is passionately attached to her brother, who has
hitherto been her only care. Finally Christine promises to marry any
man who will go as substitute for her brother. Gontran de l'Ancry, a
young nobleman, whose heart is touched by the maiden's tenderness and
beauty, places himself at Bombardon's disposal and receives from him
the golden cross, which Christine has placed in his hands, to be
offered as a pledge of fidelity to her brother's deliverer. Christine
does not get to know him, as Gontran departs immediately. The act
closes with Cola's marriage.

The second act takes place two years later. Cola, who could not be
detained from marching against the enemy, has been wounded, but saved
from being killed by an officer, who received the bullet instead. Both
return to Cola's house as invalids and are tended by the two women.
The strange officer, who is no other than Gontran, loves Christine and
she returns his passion, but deeming herself bound to another, she does
not betray her feeling. Gontran is about to bid her farewell, but
when in the act of taking leave, he perceives her love and tells
her that he is the officer, who was once substitute for her brother in
the war.

Christine is full of happiness; Gontran when asked for the token of her
promise, tells her, that the cross was taken from him, as he lay
senseless on the field of battle. At this moment Bombardon, returning
also as invalid, presents the cross to Christine, and she believing
that Gontran has lied to her and that Bombardon is her brother's
substitute, promises her hand to him, with a bleeding heart, but
Bombardon relates that the true owner of the cross has fallen on the
battle-field and that he took it from the dead body. Christine now
resolves to enter in a convent, when suddenly Gontran's voice is heard.
Bombardon recognizes his friend, whom he believed to be dead,
everything is explained and the scene ends with the marriage of the
good and true lovers.





Next: The Two Grenadiers

Previous: Genoveva



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