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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen








DER TROMPETER VON SAeKKINGEN.

In three acts with a prelude by VICTOR NESSLER.

Text by RUDOLF BUNGE after SCHEFFEL'S poem.


Seldom in our days is an opera such a complete success in all German
theatres, as this composition of Nessler's has proved to be. To tell
the truth, it owes its popularity in great degree to the libretto,
which has taken so many fine songs and ideas from its universally known
and adored original. Nessler's Trompeter is however in every way
inferior to Scheffel's celebrated poem.



Nevertheless the music, though not very profound is pleasing, and there
are several airs in it, which have already become popular.

The prelude opens at Heidelberg, where a chorus of students make a
great noise after one of their drinking-bouts. They presently serenade
the Princess-Electress, and a law-student, named Werner, a foundling
and the adopted son of a professor, distinguishes himself by a solo on
the trumpet. He is heard by the trumpeter of the Imperial recruiting
officers, who tries to win him, but without success, when suddenly the
Rector Magnificus appears, to assist the major-domo, and announces to
the astounded disturbers of peace, that they are dismissed from the
university.

Werner, taking a sudden resolution, accepts the press-money from
Konradin the trumpeter, marches away with the soldiers, and the prelude
is closed.

The first act represents a scene at Sakkingen on the Rhine. There is a
festival in honor of St. Fridolin, at which young Baroness Maria
assists. She is insulted by the peasants and Werner protects her from
them. She is much pleased by the noble bearing of the trumpeter, and
so is her aunt, the Countess of Wildenstein, who detects a great
resemblance between him and her son, who was stolen by gipsies in his
childhood.--The second scene takes us into the Baron's room, where we
find the gouty old gentleman in rather a bad humor. He is restored to
good temper by a letter from his friend, the Count of
Wildenstein, who lives separated from his first wife, the above
mentioned Countess, and who proposes his son, born in second wedlock,
as Maria's husband.

The Baron receives Maria kindly, when she relates her adventure and
begs him to engage Werner as trumpeter in the castle. At this moment
the latter is heard blowing his instrument and the Baron, who has a
great predilection for it, bids Werner present himself and at once
engages him.

In the second act Werner gives lessons on the trumpet to the lovely
Maria; of course the young people fall in love with each other, but the
Countess watches them, until friend Konradin for once succeeds in
drawing her aside, when there follows a glowing declaration of love on
both sides. Unhappily it is interrupted by the Countess, who announces
her discovery to the Baron. Meanwhile the destined bridegroom has
arrived with his father. Damian, that is the young man's name, is a
simpleton, and Maria declares at once that she never will be his. But
in the presence of the whole company, assembled for a festival, the
Baron proclaims Maria Count Damian's bride; to the over-bold Werner he
forbids the castle.

The last act opens with a siege of the castle by the rebellious
peasants. Damian shows himself a coward. In the last extremity they
are relieved by Werner, who drives the peasants back with his soldiers.
He is wounded in the fray, and while the wound is being dressed, a mole
detected on his arm proclaims him the stolen child of Countess
Wildenstein. All now ends in joy and happiness; the Baron is willing
enough to give his daughter to the brave young nobleman and very glad
to be rid of the cowardly Damian.





Next: Undine

Previous: Il Trovatore



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