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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



The Magic Flute








DIE ZAUBERFLOeTE

In two acts by MOZART.

Text by SCHIKANEDER.


This last opera of Mozart's, written only a few months before his
death, approaches so near to perfection, that one almost feels in it
the motion of the spirit-wings which were so soon alas! to bear
away Mozart's genius from earth, too early by far, for he died at the
age of 35, having accomplished in this short space of time more than
other great composers in a long life.

The Magic Flute is one of the most remarkable operas known on the
stage. It is half fictitious, half allegorical.--The text, done by the
old stage-director Schikaneder was long mistaken for a fiction without
any common sense, but Mozart saw deeper, else he would not have adapted
his wonderful music to it.--It is true that the tales of old Egypt are
mixed up in a curious manner with modern freemasonry, but nobody,
except a superficial observer, could fail to catch a deep moral sense
in the naive rhymes.

The contents of the opera are the following: Prince Tamino, a youth as
valiant as he is noble and virtuous, is implored by the Queen of Night,
to save her daughter, whom the old and sage High-priest Sarastro has
taken from her by force. The bereaved mother pours forth her woe in
heart-melting sounds and promises everything to the rescuer of her
child. Tamino is filled with ardent desire to serve her.--On his way
he meets the gay Papageno, who at once agrees to share the Prince's
adventures. Papageno is the gay element in the opera; always cheerful
and in high spirits, his ever-ready tongue plays him many a funny
trick. So we see him once with a lock on his mouth by way of
punishment for his idle prating. As he promises never to tell a lie
any more, the lock is taken away by the three Ladies of the Queen
of Night. Those Ladies present Tamino with a golden flute, giving at
the same time an instrument made with little silver bells to Papageno,
both of which are to help them in times of danger. The Queen of Night
even sends with them three boy-angels. These are to point out to them
the ways and means by which they may attain their purpose.

Now the young and beautiful Princess Pamina is pursued by declarations
of love from a negro-servant of Sarastro. Papageno comes to her
rescue, frightening the negro Monostatos with his feathery dress.
Papageno, on the other hand fears the negro on account of his
blackness, believing him to be the devil in person. Papageno escapes
with Pamina, but the negro overtakes him with his servants. Then
Papageno shakes his bells, and lo, all forgetting their wrath forthwith
begin to dance.

Meanwhile Tamino reaches 'Sarastro's castle, and at once asks for the
High-priest, poor Pamina's bitter enemy. The Under-priests do not
allow him to enter, but explain that their Master Sarastro is as good
as he is sage, and that he always acts for the best. They assure
Tamino, that the Princess lives and is in no danger. Full of thanks,
the Prince begins to play on his flute; and just then he hears
Papageno's bells. At this juncture Sarastro appears, the wise Master,
before whom they al bow. He punishes the wicked negro; but Tamino and
his Pamina are not to be united without first having given ample proof
of their love and constancy. Tamino determines to undergo
whatever trials may await him, but the Queen of Night, knowing all,
sends her three Ladies, to deter Tamino and his comrade from their
purpose. But all temptation is gallantly set aside; they have given a
promise to Sarastro which they will keep.

Even the Queen of Night herself is unable to weaken their strength of
purpose; temptations of every kind overtake them, but Tamino remains
firm. He is finally initiated into the mysteries of the goddess Isis.

In the interval Pamina deems Tamino faithless. She would fain die, but
the three celestial youths console her, by assuring her that Tamino's
love is true, and that he passes through the most severe trials solely
on her behalf.

On hearing this Pamina at once asks to share in the trials, and so they
walk together through fire and water, protected by the golden flute, as
well as by their courage and constancy. They come out purified and
happy.

Papageno, having lost his companion, has grown quite melancholy and
longs for the little wife, that was promised to him and shown to him
only for a few moments. He resolves at last to end his life by hanging
himself, when the celestial youths appear, reminding him of his bells.
He begins to shake them, and Papagena appears in feathery dress, the
very counter-part of himself. All might now be well, were it not that
the Queen of Night, a somewhat unreasonable lady, broods vengeance.
She accepts the negro Monostatos as her avenger, and promises to
give him her daughter. But already Sarastro has done his work; Tamino
is united to his Pamina, and before the sunny light of truth everything
else vanishes and sinks back into night.





Next: The Maidens Of Schilda

Previous: The Maccabees



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