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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



The Postilion Of Longjumeau








In three acts by ADOLPHE ADAM.

Text by LEUVEN and BRUNSWICK.


This charming little opera is well worthy of being named among the best
of its kind, both on account of its delightful music and because the
text is so entertaining and funny as entirely to captivate the hearer's
interest.

The whole opera is essentially French in the best sense of the word and
we scarce can find a more graceful and witty composition. Its subject,
written originally in good French verse is as follows:

Chapelou, stage-driver at Longjumeau is about to celebrate his marriage
with the young hostess of the post-house, Madelaine. The wedding has
taken place and the young bride is led away by her friends, according
to an old custom, while her bridegroom is held back by his comrades,
who compel him to sing. He begins the romance of a young
postilion, who had the luck to be carried away by a Princess, having
touched her heart by his beautiful playing on the cornet. Chapelou has
such a fine voice, that the Superintendent of the Grand Opera at Paris,
the Marquis de Corcy, who hears him, is enchanted, and being in search
of a good tenor, succeeds in winning over Chapelou, who consents to
leave his young wife in order to follow the Marquis' call to glory and
fortune. He begs his friend Bijou, a smith, to console Madeleine, by
telling her that he will soon return to her. While Madeleine calls for
him in tenderest accents, he drives away with his protectors and Bijou
delivers his message, determined to try his fortune in a similar way.
The desperate Madeleine resolves to fly from the unhappy spot, where
everything recalls to her her faithless husband.

In the second act we find Madeleine under the assumed name of Madame de
Latour. She has inherited a fortune from an old aunt, and makes her
appearance in Paris as a rich and noble lady, with the intention of
punishing her husband, whom she however still loves. During these six
years, that have passed since their wedding-day, Chapelou has won his
laurels under the name of St. Phar and is now the first tenor of the
Grand Opera and everybody's spoilt favorite. Bijou is with him as
leader of the chorus, and is called Alcindor. We presently witness a
comical rehearsal in which the principal singers are determined to do
as badly as possible. They all seem hoarse and instead of
singing, produce the most lamentable sounds. The Marquis de Corcy is
desperate, having promised this representation to Mme. Latour, at whose
country-seat near Fontainebleau he is at present staying. As soon as
St. Phar hears the name of this lady, his hoarseness is gone and all
sing their best. We gather from this scene, that Mme. Latour has
succeeded in enthralling St. Phar; he has an interview with her, and,
won by his protestations of love, she consents to marry him.

St. Phar, not wishing to commit bigamy, begs his friend Bijou to
perform the marriage-ceremony in a priest's garb, but Mme. Latour locks
him in her room, along with Bourdon, the second leader of the chorus,
while a real priest unites the pair for the second time.

St. Phar enters the room in high spirits, when his companions, beside
themselves with fear, tell him that he has committed bigamy. While
they are in mortal terror of being hanged, Mme. Latour enters in her
former shape as Madeleine, and blowing out the candle, torments St.
Phar, assuming now the voice of Mme. Latour, now that of
Madeleine.--After having sent her fickle husband into an abyss of
unhappiness and fear, the Marquis de Corcy, who had himself hoped to
wed the charming widow, appears with the police to imprison the
luckless St. Phar, who already considers himself as good as hanged, and
in imagination sees his first wife Madeleine rejoicing over his
punishment. But he has been made to suffer enough and at the
last moment Madelaine explains everything, and Chapelou obtains her
pardon.





Next: Preciosa

Previous: The Poacher



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