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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Will O' The Wisp








In one act by KARL GRAMANN

IRRLICHT

Text by KURT GEUCKE.


With "Irrlicht" the composer takes a step towards verisme; both,
subject and music are terribly realistic, though without the last shade
of triviality. The music is often of brilliant dramatic effect,
and the fantastic text, well matching the music, is as rich in
thrilling facts as any modern Italian opera. Indeed this seems to be
by far the best opera, which the highly gifted composer has written.

The scene is laid on a pilot's station on the coast of Normandy. A
pilot-boat has been built and is to be baptized with the usual
ceremonies. Tournaud, an old ship-captain expects his daughter
Gervaise back from a stay in Paris. He worships her, and when she
arrives, he is almost beside himself with joy and pride. But Gervaise
is pale and sad, and hardly listens to gay Marion, who tells her of the
coming festival.--Meanwhile all the fisher-people from far and near
assemble to participate in the baptism, and Andre, who is to be captain
of the boat, is about to choose a god-mother amongst the fair maidens
around, when he sees Gervaise coming out of the house, where she has
exchanged her travelling garb for a national-dress. Forgotten are all
the village-lasses, and Andre chooses Gervaise, who reluctantly
consents to baptize the boat, and is consequently received very
ungraciously by the maidens and their elders. She blesses the boat
which sails off among the cheers of the crowd with the simple words:
"God bless thee". Andre, who loves Gervaise with strong and
everlasting affection turns to her full of hope. He is gently but
firmly rebuked, and sadly leaves her, while Gervaise is left to her own
sad memories, which carry her back to the short happy time, when she
was loved and won and alas forsaken by a stranger of high
position. Marion, who loves Andre hopelessly, vainly tries to brighten
up her companion. They are all frightened by the news of a ship being
in danger at sea. A violent storm has arisen, and when Maire Grisard,
the builder of the yacht pronounces her name "Irrlicht," Gervaise
starts with a wild cry. The ship is seen battling with the waves,
while Andre rushes in to bring Gervaise a telegraphic dispatch from
Paris. It tells her, that her child is at death's door. Tournaud,
catching the paper, in a moment guesses the whole tragedy of his
daughter's life. In his shame and wrath he curses her, but all her
thoughts are centered on the ship, on which the count, her child's
father is struggling against death. She implores Andre to save him,
but he is deaf to her entreaties. Then she rushes off to ring the
alarm-bell, but nobody dares to risk his life in the storm. At last,
seeing all her efforts vain, she looses a boat, and drives out alone
into night and perdition. As soon as Andre perceives her danger, he
follows her. At this moment a flash of lightning which is followed by
a deafening crash shows the Yacht rising out of the waves for the last
time, and then plunging down into a watery grave forever.--The whole
assembly sink on their knees in fervent prayer, which is so far
granted, that Andre brings back Gervaise unhurt. She is but in a deep
swoon, and her father, deeply touched, pardons her. When she opens her
eyes, and shudderingly understands that her sacrifice was fruitless,
she takes a little flask of poison from her bosom and slowly
empties it. Then, taking a last farewell of the home of her childhood
and of her early love, she recommends Marion to Andre's care. By this
time the poison has begun to take effect and the poor girl, thinking
that in the waving willow branches she sees the form of her lover,
beckoning to her, sighs "I come beloved" and sinks back dead.





Next: La Juive The Jewess

Previous: Joseph In Egypt



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