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A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Wedding's Morning








HOCHZEITSMORGEN

In one act by KARL VON KASKEL.

Text by FRANZ KOPPEL-ELLFELD.


This opera, which was represented for the first time at the Royal Opera
in Dresden on April 29th, 1893, is the first attempt of its young
composer, and as such shows considerable talent, even genius.

Indeed it sins rather in too much than in too little invention; it
would seem that Kaskel's brain, overflowing with musical ideas, wanted
to put them all into this one first child of his muse. This promises
well for the future, but it explains, why it lacks the great attraction
of Cavalleria with which it has some relation, without imitating it in
the least. The hearer's attention is tired by too much and divided by
lack of unity. Nevertheless the composer has understood how to make
the most of a somewhat weak libretto, and the manner in which the
musical interest increases from scene to scene is admirable in a
beginner.



The scene is laid in an Italian Frontier Fortress near Mentone at the
foot of Col di Tenda. It may be added here, that the national
colouring is particularly well hit.

Giovanna, the daughter of Regina Negri an inn-keeper is betrothed to
Pietro Montalto, Captain of the Bersaglieri; and the wedding is fixed
for the following morning. Before her betrothal Giovanna has carried
on a flirtation with Paolo Tosta, a wild fellow, who unfortunately took
the girl's play seriously, and seeing the friend of his childhood
estranged from him, has turned smuggler and head of a band of
Anarchists. Giovanna is afraid of him, and trembles for her
bridegroom, whom she loves truly.

However, when she sees Paolo taken captive and sentenced to death by
her own lover, she implores the latter to deal mercifully with the
miscreant. She has neglected to tell him of her early friendship for
the captive, and so Pietro, who does not understand her softness for
the ruffian refuses, his soldierly honour being at stake. But at last
love conquers and Giovanna extracts a promise from him, to let the
prisoner escape during the night.

Left alone, Pietro's keen sense of duty reawakes and he leaves the
place without freeing the captive.

However Toto, a dealer in tobacco, Paolo's friend and helpmate in
smuggling arrives and releases him. Instead of escaping Paolo seeks
Giovanna, and when she turns from him with loathing, he swears, either
to possess her, or to destroy her bridegroom.



On the following morning Pietro hears from Bastiano, the Bersaglieri
Sergeant, that the keys of the prison have been stolen, and the
prisoner has escaped. Pietro rejoices, that this happened without his
own intervention and turns full of happiness to his bride, who stands
ready for the wedding. The wedding-procession is slowly moving towards
church, when it is suddenly arrested by Paolo, who throws himself
between the lovers. "Mine she was, before she knew you," he cries out,
"to me she swore eternal faith, which she has now falsely broken."
Giovanna, struck dumb by terror, is unable to defend herself.--Pietro
orders his men to recapture the ruffian, but quick as thought Paolo has
deprived the soldier nearest to him of his sabre and with the words
"Thou shalt die first," has thrust it towards Pietro. Alas, it is
Giovanna's breast, he pierces; she has shielded her lover with her own
body.--With a sweet smile she turns to Pietro, who implores her to
speak. "Pardon me," she sighs faintly, "he was long a stranger to my
heart; thee alone I loved, to thee I was faithful unto death." With
those loving words she sinks back expiring.





Next: Les Huguenots

Previous: Herrat



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