A woman shoots her husband. Then she holds him under water for over 5 minutes. Finally, she hangs him. But 5 minutes later they both go out together and enjoy a wonderful dinner together. How can this be? ... Read more of How Can This Be? at Free Jokes.caInformational Site Network Informational
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Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
By Order Of His Highness
Cosi Fan Tutte
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fra Diavolo
Friend Fritz
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Iphigenia In Aulis
Jean De Paris
Kirke Circe
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Les Huguenots
Lohengrin
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Martha
Melusine
Moloch
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Return
Pagliacci
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Romeo E Giulietta
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Three Pintos
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Werther



Zampa








In three acts by HEROLD.

Text by MELLESVILLE.


This opera has met with great success both in France and elsewhere; it
is a favorite of the public, though not free from imitating other
musicians, particularly Auber and Rossini. The style of the text is
somewhat bombastic, and only calculated for effect. Notwithstanding
these defects the opera pleases; it has a brilliant introduction,
as well as nice chorus-pieces and cavatinas.

In the first act Camilla, daughter of Count Lugano expects her
bridegroom Alfonso di Monza, a Sicilian officer, for the wedding
ceremony. Dandolo, her servant, who was to fetch the priest, comes
back in a fright and with him the notorious Pirate-captain, Zampa, who
has taken her father and her bridegroom captive. He tells Camilla who
he is, and forces her to renounce Alfonso and consent to a marriage
with himself, threatening to kill the prisoners, if she refuses
compliance.--Then the pirates hold a drinking-bout in the Count's
house, and Zampa goes so far in his insolence, as to put his
bridal-ring on the finger of a marble statue, standing in the room. It
represents Alice, formerly Zampa's bride; whose heart was broken by her
lover's faithlessness; then the fingers of the statue close over the
ring, while the left hand is upraised threateningly. Nevertheless
Zampa is resolved to wed Camilla, though Alice appears once more, and
even Alfonso, who interferes by revealing Zampa's real name and by
imploring his bride to return to him, cannot change the brigand's
plans. Zampa and his comrades have received the Viceroy's pardon,
purposing to fight against the Turks, and so Camilla dares not provoke
the pirate's wrath by retracting her promise. Vainly she implores
Zampa to give her father his freedom and to let her enter a convent.
Zampa, hoping that she only fears the pirate in him tells her, that he
is Count of Monza, and Alfonso, who had already drawn his sword,
throws it away, terrified to recognize in the dreaded pirate his own
brother, who has by his extravagances once already impoverished him.

Zampa sends Alfonso to prison and orders the statue to be thrown into
the sea. Camilla once more begs for mercy, but seeing that it is
likely to avail her nothing, she flies to the Madonna's altar, charging
him loudly with Alice's death. With scorn and laughter he seizes
Camilla, to tear her from the altar, but instead of the living hand of
Camilla, he feels the icy hand of Alice, who draws him with her into
the waves.

Camilla is saved and united to Alfonso, while her delivered father
arrives in a boat, and the statue rises again from the waves, to bless
the union.





Next: The Apothecary

Previous: The Walkyrie



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