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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



The Two Peters








CZAR AND ZIMMERMANN

In three acts by LORTZING.


This charming little opera had even more success than Lortzing's other
compositions; it is a popular opera in the best sense of the word.
Lortzing ought to have made his fortune by it, for it was soon claimed
by every stage. He had composed it for Christmas 1837 and in the year
1838 every street-organ played its principal melodies. But the
directors paid miserable sums to the lucky composer. (F. e. a copy of
the work cost him 25 thalers, while he did not get more than 30 to 50
thalers from the directors.)

The libretto was composed by Lortzing himself; he took it out of an old
comedy.

Peter, Emperor of Russia, has taken service on the wharfs of Saardam as
simple ship-carpenter under the assumed name of Peter Michaelow. Among
his companions is another Peter, named Ivanow, a Russian renegade, who
has fallen in love with Mary, the niece of the burgomaster Van Bett.

The two Peters being countrymen and fearing discovery, have become
friendly, but Ivanow instinctively feeling his friend's superiority, is
jealous of him, and Mary, a little coquette, nourishes his passion.

Meanwhile the ambassadors of France and England, each of whom wishes
for a special connection with the Czar of Russia, have discovered where
he must be, and both bribe the conceited simpleton Van Bett, who tries
to find out the real Peter.

He assembles the people, but there are many Peters amongst them, though
only two strangers. He asks them whence they come, then takes aside
Peter Ivanow, cross-questioning him in vain as to what he wishes to
know.



At last, being aware of Peter's love for Mary, he gives him some hope
of gaining her hand, and obtains in exchange a promise from the young
man, to confess his secret in presence of the foreign nobleman.--The
cunning French ambassador, the Marquis de Chateauneuf, has easily found
out the Czar and gained his purpose, while the phlegmatic English Lord,
falsely directed by the burgomaster, is still in transaction with
Ivanow. All this takes place during a rural festivity, where the
Marquis notwithstanding the claims upon his attention finds time to
court yet pretty Mary, exciting Ivanow's hate and jealousy. Ivanow
with difficulty plays the role of Czar, which personage he is supposed
to be as well by Lord Syndham as by Van Bett. He well knows that he
deserves punishment, if he is found out on either side. The
burgomaster, getting more and more confused, and fearing himself
surrounded by spies and cheats, examines one of the strangers after the
other, and is of course confounded to hear their high-flown names; at
last he seizes the two Peters, but is deterred from his purpose by the
two ambassadors. They are now joined by a third, the Russian General
Lefort, who comes to call back his Sovereign to his own country. In
the third act Van Bett has prepared a solemn demonstration of fealty
for the supposed Czar, whom he still mistakes for the real one, while
the real Czar has found means to go on board of his ship with the
Marquis and Lefort.--Before taking farewell, he promises a pass-port to
Ivanow, who is very dubious as to what will become of him.
Meanwhile Van Bett approaches him with his procession to do homage, but
during his long and confused speech cannon-shots are heard and an usher
announces, that Peter Michaelow is about to sail away with a large
crew. The back-ground opens and shows the port with the Czar's ship.
Everybody bursts into shouts "Long live the Czar!" and Ivanow, opening
the paper, which his high-born friend left to him, reads that the Czar
grants him pardon for his desertion and bestows upon him a considerable
sum of money.





Next: La Dame Blanche

Previous: Cosi Fan Tutte



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