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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



The King Has Said It








LE ROI L'A DIT.

In three acts by LEON DELIBES.

Text by EDMOND GONDINET.


It is impossible to imagine music more charming or more full of grace
and piquancy, than that which we find in this delightful opera. Every
part abounds in exquisite harmonies, which no words can give any idea
of. On hearing them one is compelled to the conclusion, that all the
graces have stood godmother to this lovely child of their muse.

The libretto though on the whole somewhat insipid, is flavored with
naive and goodnatured coquetry, which lends a certain charm to it.

The Marquis de Moncontour has long wished to be presented to the King
Louis XIV., and as he has been fortunate enough to catch the escaped
paroquet of Mme. de Maintenon, he is at last to have his wish
accomplished. By way of preparation for his audience he tries to learn
the latest mode of bowing, his own being somewhat antiquated and the
Marquise and her four lovely daughters and even Javotte, the nice
little ladies'-maid, assist him. After many failures the old gentleman
succeeds in making his bow to his own satisfaction, and he is put into
a litter, and born off, followed by his people's benedictions. When
they are gone, Benoit, a young peasant comes to see Javotte, who is his
sweetheart. He wishes to enter the Marquis' service. Javotte
thinks him too awkward, but she promises to intercede in his favor with
Miton, a dancing-master, who enters just as Benoit disappears. He has
instructed the graceful Javotte in all the arts and graces of the noble
world, and when he rehearses the steps and all the nice little tricks
of his art with her, he is so delighted with his pupil, that he
pronounces her manners worthy of a Princess; but when Javotte tells him
that she loves a peasant, he is filled with disgust and orders her
away. His real pupils, the four lovely daughters of the Marquis now
enter and while the lesson goes on, Miton hands a billet-doux from some
lover to each of them. The two elder, Agatha and Chimene, are just in
the act of reading theirs, when they hear a serenade outside, and
shortly afterwards the two lovers are standing in the room, having
taken their way through the window. The Marquis Flarembel and his
friend, the Marquis de la Bluette are just making a most ardent
declaration of love, when Mme. la Marquise enters to present to her
elder daughters the two bridegrooms she has chosen for them. The young
men hide behind the ample dresses of the young ladies, and all begin to
sing with great zeal, Miton beating the measure, so that some time
elapses, before the Marquise is able to state her errand. Of course
her words excite great terror, the girls flying to the other side of
the room with their lovers and receiving the two elderly suitors, Baron
de Merlussac and Gautru, a rich old financier, with great coolness and
a refusal of their costly gifts. When the suitors are gone, the
two young strangers are detected and the angry mother decides at once
to send her daughters to a convent, from which they shall only issue on
their wedding-day.

When they have departed in a most crest-fallen condition, the old
Marquis returns from his audience with the King and relates its
astounding results. His Majesty had been so peremptory in his
questioning about the Marquis' son and heir, that the Marquis, losing
his presence of mind, promised to present his son at Court on the
King's demand. The only question now is where to find a son to adopt,
as the Marquis has only four daughters. Miton, the ever-useful, at
once presents Benoit to the parents, engaging himself to drill the
peasant into a nice cavalier in ten lessons. Benoit takes readily to
his new position; he is fitted out at once and when the merchants come,
offering their best in cloth and finery, he treats them with an
insolence, worthy of the proudest Seigneur. He even turns from his
sweet-heart Javotte.

In the second act Benoit, dressed like the finest cavalier, gives a
masked ball in his father's gardens. Half Versailles is invited, but
having taken the Court Almanac to his aid, he has made the mistake of
inviting many people who have long been dead. Those who do appear,
seem to him to be very insipid, and wanting some friends with whom he
can enjoy himself, the useful Miton presents the Marquis de la Bluette
and de Flarembel, who are delighted to make the acquaintance of
their sweethearts' brother.

Benoit hears from them, that he has four charming sisters, who have
been sent to a convent and he at once promises to assist his new
friends. Meanwhile Javotte appears in the mask of an oriental Queen
and Benoit makes love to her, but he is very much stupified when she
takes off her mask, and he recognizes Javotte. She laughingly turns
away from him, when the good-for-nothing youth's new parents appear, to
reproach him with his levity. But Benoit, nothing daunted rushes away,
telling the Marquis that he intends to visit his sisters in the
convent. Miton tries in vain to recall him. Then the two old suitors
of Agathe and Chimene appear, to complain that their deceased wife and
grand-mother were invited, and while the Marquis explains his son's
mistake, the four daughters rush in, having been liberated by their
lovers and their unknown brother, whom they greet with a fondness very
shocking to the old Marchioness. The elderly suitors withdraw,
swearing to take vengeance on the inopportune brother.

In the last act Benoit appears in his father's house in a somewhat
dilapidated state. He has spent the night amongst gay companions and
met Gautru and de Merlussac successively, who have both fought him and
believe they have killed him, Benoit having feigned to be dead on the
spot.

When the old Marquis enters, he is very much astonished at receiving
two letters of condolence from his daughter's suitors. Miton
appears in mourning, explaining that Mme. de Maintenon's visit being
expected, they must all wear dark colors as she prefers these.
Meanwhile Benoit has had an interview with Javotte, in which he
declares his love to be undiminished, and he at once asks his father to
give him Javotte as his wife, threatening to reveal the Marquis' deceit
to the King, if his request is not granted. In this dilemma help comes
in the persons of the two young Marquises, who present their King's
condolences to old Moncontour. This gentleman hears to his great
relief, that his son is supposed to have fallen in a duel, and so he is
disposed of. Nobody is happier than Javotte, who now claims Benoit for
her own, while the Marquis, who receives a Duke's title from the King
in compensation for his loss, gladly gives his two elder daughters to
their young and noble lovers.

The girls, well aware, that they owe their happiness to their adopted
brother, are glad to provide him with ample means for his marriage with
Javotte, and the affair ends to everybody's satisfaction.





Next: Romeo E Giulietta

Previous: Robert Le Diable



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