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Comic Opera

A King Against His Will
A Night's Rest At Granada
Abu Hassan
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Ballo In Maschera
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
By Order Of His Highness
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Cosi Fan Tutte
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Don Pasquale
Donna Diana
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Falstaff
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Fra Diavolo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Barbiere Di Seviglia
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jean De Paris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Dame Blanche
La Figlia Del Reggimento
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Domino Noir
Le Nozze Di Figaro
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Martha
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Sealed
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Apothecary
The Armorer
The Barber Of Bagdad
The Beauties Of Fogaras
The Bell Of The Hermit
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Departure
The Devil's Part
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The King Has Said It
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Maidens Of Schilda
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Merry Wives Of Windsor
The Nibelungen Ring
The Nuremberg Doll
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Poacher
The Postilion Of Longjumeau
The Queen Of Sheba
The Sold Bride
The Taming Of The Shrew
The Templar And The Jewess
The Three Pintos
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Two Grenadiers
The Two Peters
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa


The Standard Operaglass

A Night's Rest At Granada
Aida
Alessandro Stradella
Armida
Bearskin
Benvenuto Cellini
Carmen
Cavalleria Rusticana
Delila
Der Freischuetz
Djamileh
Don Carlos
Don Juan
Elektra
Ernani
Eugene Onegin
Euryanthe
Fidelio
Flauto Solo
Frauenlob
Friend Fritz
Genoveva
Guglielmo Tell
Gustavus The Third
Hamlet
Hans Heiling
Hansel And Gretel
Henry The Lion
Herrat
Hoffmann's Tales
Idle Hans
Idomeneus
Il Demonio
Il Seraglio
Il Trovatore
Ingrid
Iphigenia In Aulis
Iphigenia In Tauris
Jessonda
Joseph In Egypt
Junker Heinz Sir Harry
Kirke Circe
L'africaine
La Boheme
La Juive The Jewess
La Muette De Portici
La Somnambula
La Traviata
Le Prophete
Les Huguenots
Little Bare Foot
Lohengrin
Lorle
Love's Battle
Lucia Di Lammermoor
Lucrezia Borgia
Madame Butterfly
Manon
Manru
Marga
Marguerite
Melusine
Merlin
Mignon
Moloch
Nausikaa
Norma
Oberon
Odysseus' Death
Odysseus' Return
Orfeo E Eurydice
Othello
Pagliacci
Philemon And Baucis
Preciosa
Rienzi The Last Of The Tribunes
Rigoletto
Robert Le Diable
Romeo E Giulietta
Salome
Siegfried
Silvana
Tannhaeuser
The Alpine King And The Misanthrope
The Cid
The Cricket On The Hearth
The Dusk Of The Gods
The Evangelimann
The Fledermaus The Bat
The Flying Dutchman
The Folkungs
The Golden Cross
The Lowlands
The Maccabees
The Magic Flute
The Master-singers Of Nueremberg
The Master-thief
The Nibelungen Ring
The Piper Of Hameln
The Plague Of Darkness
The Queen Of Sheba
The Templar And The Jewess
The Trumpeter Of Saekkingen
The Vampire
The Walkyrie
Tosca
Tristan And Isolda
Undine
Urvasi
Wedding's Morning
Werther
Will O' The Wisp
Zampa



A King Against His Will








DER KONIG WIDER WILLEN

In three acts by EMANUEL CHABRIER.

Text after a comedy written by ANCELOT, from EMILE DE NAJAC and PAUL
BURANI.


The composer has recently become known in Germany by his opera
Gwendoline, performed at Leipsic a short time ago. His latest opera,
"A King against his will", was represented on the Royal Opera in
Dresden, April 26th 1890, and through its wit, grace and originality
won great applause.--Indeed, though not quite free from "raffinement",
its melodies are exquisitely interesting and lovely. Minka's Bohemian
song, her duet with De Nangis, her lover, as well as the duet between
the King and Alexina are master-pieces, and the national coloring
in the song of the Polish bodyguard is characteristic enough.

The libretto is most amusing, though the plot is complicated. The
scene is laid at Cracow in the year 1574.--Its subject is derived from
a historical fact. Henry de Valois has been elected King of Poland,
through the machinations of his ambitious mother, Catarina di Medici,
to whom it has been prophesied, that all her sons should be crowned.

The gay Frenchman most reluctantly accepts the honor, but the delight
of his new Polish subjects at having him, is not greater than his own
enchantment with his new Kingdom.

The first act shows the new King surrounded by French noblemen, gay and
thoughtless like himself; but watching all his movements by orders of
his mother, who fears his escape. By chance the King hears from a
young bondwoman Minka, who loves De Nangis, his friend, and wishes to
save him a price, that a plot had been formed by the Polish noblemen,
who do not yet know him personally, and he at once decides to join the
conspiracy against his own person.--Knowing his secretary, Fritelli to
be one of the conspirators, he declares that he is acquainted with
their proceedings and threatens him with death, should he not silently
submit to all his orders.--The frightened Italian promises to lead him
into the house of Lasky, the principal conspirator, where he intends to
appear as De Nangis. But before this, in order to prevent discovery he
assembles his guard and suite, and in their presence accuses his
favorite De Nangis with treachery, and has him safely locked up in
apparent deep disgrace.

The second act opens with a festival at Lasky's, under cover of which
the King is to be arrested and sent over the frontier. Now the King,
being a total stranger to the whole assembly, excepting Fritelli,
presents himself as De Nangis and swears to dethrone his fickle friend,
the King, this very night. But meanwhile De Nangis, who, warned by
Minka's song, has escaped from his confinement through the window,
comes up, and is at once presented by the pretended De Nangis as King
Henry. The true De Nangis complying with the jest, at once issues his
Kingly orders, threatening to punish his antagonists and proclaiming
his intention to make the frightened Minka his Queen. He is again
confined by the conspirators, who, finding him so dangerous, resolve to
kill him. This is entirely against King Henry's will, and he at once
revokes his oath, proclaiming himself to be the true King and offering
himself, if need shall be as their victim. But he is not believed; the
only person, who knows him, Fritelli, disowns him, and Alexina, the
secretary's wife, a former sweetheart of the King in Venice, to whom he
has just made love again under his assumed name, declares, that he is
De Nangis.--Henry is even appointed by lot to inflict the death-stroke
on the unfortunate King. Determined to destroy himself rather than let
his friend suffer, he opens the door to De Nangis' prison, but
the bird has again flown. Minka, though despairing of ever belonging
to one so highborn has found means to liberate him, and is now ready to
suffer for her interference. She is however protected by Henry, who
once more swears to force the King from the country.

The third act takes place in the environs of Crakow, where preparations
are made for the King's entry. No one knows who is to be crowned,
Henry de Valois or the Arch-Duke of Austria, the pretender supported by
the Polish nobles, but Fritelli coming up assures the innkeeper, that
it is to be the Arch-Duke. Meanwhile the King enters in hot haste
asking for horses, in order to take himself away as quickly as
possible. Unfortunately there is only one horse left and no driver,
but the King orders this to be got ready, and declares that he will
drive himself. During his absence Alexina and Minka, who have
proceeded to the spot, are full of pity for the unfortunate King, as
well as for his friend De Nangis. Alexina resolves to put on servant's
clothes, in order to save the fugitive, and to drive herself. Of
course Henry is enchanted when recognizing his fair driver and both set
about to depart.

Minka, left alone, bewails her fate and wants to stab herself,
whereupon De Nangis suddenly appears in search for the King. At the
sight of him, Minka quickly dries her tears, being assured that her
lover is true to her. Fritelli however, who at first had rejoiced to
see his wife's admirer depart, is greatly dismayed at hearing
that his fair wife was the servant-driver. He madly rushes after them,
to arrest the fugitives. But the faithful guard is already on the
King's track, and together with his Cavaliers, brings them back in
triumph.

Finding that, whether her will or no, he must abide by his lot, and
hearing further, that the Arch-Duke has renounced his pretentions to
the crown of Poland, the King at last submits. He unites the faithful
lovers, De Nangis and Minka, sends Fritelli as Ambassador to Venice
accompanied by his wife Alexina, and all hail Henry de Valois as King
of Poland.





Next: Lohengrin

Previous: Junker Heinz Sir Harry



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